Hiking the Edisto Nature Trail

The Lowcountry town of Jacksonboro (between Point South and Charleston) is the perfect spot to get out and stretch your legs on the Edisto Nature Trail. The trail is located on Highway 17, adjacent to the Edisto River. Jacksonboro is in the area known as the ACE Basin. This low-lying part of the state is full of former rice plantations with beautiful marsh and river views, and teaming with wildlife.

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Penn Center

The Penn School was founded in 1862 as a part of the Port Royal Experiment. It was one of the first schools in the south to educate former slaves. 80 students were enrolled the first year, and classes were held in the brick church. Just two years later, the school started acquiring more land, and by 1865, a three-room schoolhouse was built. This school building made history as the first schoolhouse built for the instruction of former slaves.

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Harriet Tubman and the Combahee River Raid

Anyone who drives Highway 17 from Point South toward Charleston will cross the Combahee River and the Harriet Tubman Bridge.
Tubman, also know as “Moses”, was a former slave from Maryland who fled to freedom in 1849. After settling in Philadelphia, she spent the next decade returning to Maryland multiple times to bring over 300 enslaved people north to freedom through the Underground Railroad. She even rescued her parents, sister and her sister’s children.

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African American Heritage Sites Across the Lowcountry

Today’s Green Book of South Carolina pays homage to the original Green Book by highlighting African American heritage sites across the state. The original Green Book was published in 1936. It played a critical role in protecting African American travelers by providing information on safe travel and welcoming establishments across the United States. This guide was instrumental in helping black motorists navigate the dangers of racial segregation. It included gas stations, restaurants and lodging that were safe for African American travelers.

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Garvin Garvey Freedman’s Cottage

The Garvin House is located in the heart of Old Town Bluffton. The 1870 cottage is a great example of late 19th century Carolina Lowcountry architecture. The house was constructed during the Reconstruction Era of hand-hewn timbers and other materials found in the area.

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The Beaufort Arsenal Museum

The Beaufort Arsenal stands sentinel in downtown Beaufort. This massive brick and tabby structure was constructed over four years, from 1795-1799. Stationed in the facility, the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery was organized in April 1775 and is the fifth oldest military unit in the United States.

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Colleton State Park

The Colleton State Park is a paddlers paradise. The 35-acre park is conveniently located off I-95 at Exit 68. The park provides easy access to the Edisto River, one of the longest free flowing, blackwater rivers in the country, and serves as the headquarters for the Edisto River Canoe and Kayak Trail. Although it is the smallest of South Carolina’s state parks, it connects to Givhans Ferry State Park 23 miles away via the Edisto River.

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Take a Hike – On Edisto Island!

Edisto Island is widely known for its unspoiled beaches and yesteryear way of life. Did you know it’s also a great place to hike? The flat ground and moderate winters make it a great location for a short stroll or a day-long hike.

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The Lowcountry Turkey Trot

Worried about all the calories you’re about to devour during Thanksgiving? Save yourself some stress by participating in one of the many Turkey Trots in the Lowcountry. This fun tradition is very popular in our neck of the woods. Not only will you be doing something healthy, most races benefit a good cause. Here’s a sample of what we have to offer.

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Christmas in the South Carolina Lowcountry

The Christmas season is quickly approaching in the South Carolina Lowcountry. As we prepare to roast the turkey and welcome the family for Thanksgiving, let’s look at the events that are coming in December. The list is long, so we’ll take it town-by-town.

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