South Carolina Lowcountry: What is it all about?

What is the meaning of Lowcountry? Merriam Webster defines it as “a low-lying country or region especiallythe part of a southern state extending from the seacoast inland to the fall line.” South Carolinians define it as a geographical location and cultural mindset.  But for me… It is more than that!

It’s Beaufort, Colleton, Hampton, and Jasper, the four counties that make up the SC Lowcountry Tourism area. These four counties offer a myriad of unbelievable experiences for all.

On any given day in lowcountry you can:

 

Take a walk under the old oak trees covered in Spanish moss.

oak trees covered in spanish moss
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Feel the sand between your toes as you enjoy our gorgeous beaches.

child playing on beach with bubbles
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Pedal your way around our lush naturescapes.

bike through sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Soak up some history at one of our many museums, former plantations, or historical churches and structures.

historical churches of sc lowcountry
(Photography: Keelie Robinson)

 

Become one with nature as you spy an alligator, deer, or Great Blue Heron paddling down a lazy Lowcountry river.

kayaker on lowcountry river
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Stroll along our beaches as you scavenge for shark teeth.

shark teeth found in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Immerse yourself in the hunt for the next big fish.

fisherman in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Step off the beaten path to find our numerous hidden gems.

sunset in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Window shop our local boutiques and stores.

shopping in boutiques of sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Spy an array of birds in our Wildlife Refuges and Wildlife Management Areas

bird watchers in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

Meander along our waterfront parks.

water front park in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Savor a bounty of renowned local cuisine fresh from the sea and our nearby farms.

fresh local food in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Unwind and relax as you revel in a lowcountry sunset.

couple relaxing sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Welcome our lowcountry culture into your heart and mind as you are transported back in time.

culture of sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

Come along and we’ll explore this region, south of Charleston and north of Savannah, to find what makes the SC Lowcountry NATURALLY AMAZING!

 

 

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Lowcountry Tabby Construction

Beaufort and its surrounding sea islands are home to the largest number of tabby structures in America. Early settlers in this coastal region built structures from materials that were readily available. Oyster shells were abundant along the shorelines. Wood was available in the forests. They were both put to good use.

Tabby is a type of early concrete that is made from mixing lime, sand, and oyster shells. The oyster shells were burned and mixed with sand and lime, then poured into forms to create walls and foundations that can still be seen in Beaufort today. Bricks were also formed from tabby and used for all manners of construction.

Beaufort’s sea wall was made from tabby. The exact date of the sea wall is undetermined. It was built to protect the low-lying area from high tides.

Fort Frederick was built by the British in 1730 to protect Beaufort’s Port Royal Sound. It was constructed of tabby. This is the oldest example of tabby in the country.  The fort is preserved as the Fort Frederick Heritage Preserve and can be visited.

Tabby Manse, located on Bay Street is made from tabby walls that are two-feet thick. The Beaufort Arsenal is also made of tabby, but it is protected under layers of stucco. Originally built in 1795, the arsenal was rebuilt in 1852 and renovated in 1934. It is now the Beaufort Visitor Center and Museum.

St Helena’s Episcopal Church cemetery is surrounded by tabby walls. Many of the family plots are surrounded by smaller tabby enclosures. The church was constructed in 1842.

Many of the buildings along Bay Street were constructed using tabby. The foundation of the John Mark Verdier House is one example. Built in 1804, tabby construction can be seen on the first floor. The house is open as a museum. There’s an example of exposed tabby between two buildings in an alley on Bay Street that gives a close-up view of the materials that are combined to create the structure around 1760.

Beaufort County’s Old Sheldon Church Ruins show an example of tabby used as stucco to cover bricks. Built in 1751, the church was burned during the Revolutionary War, rebuilt, then dismantled after the Civil War.

Located on St. Helena Island, the Chapel of Ease is an excellent example of exposed tabby construction. Built in the mid 1700s, the tabby and brick is all that remains of a church that served the families of the island plantations. After the Civil War the church was used to educate freedmen. The church was destroyed by fire in 1886.

Edisto Island’s Botany Bay Wildlife Management Area is the home to the tabby ruins of Bleak Hall Plantation. Three Gothic Revival buildings are all that exist of the once sprawling plantation. A white, wooden ice house was constructed on a tabby foundation. A gardener’s shed and tabby barn also remain. Botany Bay WMA is open to the public.

Daufuskie Island’s Haig Point tabby ruins are among some of the best examples of tabby constructed slave quarters remaining in Beaufort County. Built around 1826, three of the best-preserved tabby walled, single slave dwellings are protected in the Haig Point development.

The Stoney-Baynard Plantation Ruins can be found in Sea Pines Plantation. Ruins of the tabby plantation house and the foundations of two slave cabins can be visited, along with the kitchen chimney. The house was built around 1840 and destroyed by fire in 1867.

All that remains of Fish Hall Plantation is three standing chimneys from slave cabins. This tabby is a little different. It contains clam shells in addition to oyster shells. Fish haul Plantation was built in 1762. The property was captured by Union forces during the Civil War and a portion was given to former c=slaves to develop the town of Mitchelville, the nation’s first freedmen’s village.

Sea Wall – Bay Street between Carteret and New Streets
Ft. Frederick – 601 Old Fort Road, Beaufort
Tabby Manse – Bay Street, Beaufort
Beaufort Arsenal – 713 Craven Street, Beaufort
St. Helena’s Episcopal Church 505 Church Street, Beaufort
John Mark Verdier House – 801 Bay Street, Beaufort
Alley Tabby – 715 Bay Street, Beaufort
Old Sheldon Church Ruins – Old Sheldon Road, Yemassee
St. Helena Chapel of Ease – 17 Lands End Road, St. Helena Island
Bleak Hall Plantation Tabby Ruins – 1066 Botany Bay Rd, Botany Bay WMA, Edisto Island
Haig Point – Daufuskie Island
Stoney-Baynard Plantation Ruins – 87 Plantation Drive, Sea Pines Plantation, Hilton Head Island
Fish Haul Plantation Ruins – 70 Baygall Road, Hilton Head Island

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Beaufort & the Port Royal Experiment

A new beginning

This image celebrated Emancipation Day as it was seen at Beaufort’s Ft. Frederick, also known as Camp Saxton.

The Port Royal Experiment started just seven months after the first shots of the Civil War were heard. Beaufort and its sea islands were occupied by the Union Army by November 7, 1861, thus freeing its slaves.  Beaufort quickly became the epicenter for Reconstruction after Confederate soldiers and plantation owners fled the area, leaving 200 sea island plantations and 10,000 slaves abandoned. Having no resources or direction, former slaves looked to the Union Army for support. Union officials oversaw the harvesting of approximately 90,000 pounds of cotton by the newly freed men and women. Workers were paid $1 for every 400 pounds harvested. This was the first time newly freed slaves earned wages for their hard work. Frederick Law Olmstead was the executive secretary of the US Sanitary Commission. He felt it was necessary for the Union to, “Train or educate them in a few simple, essential, and fundamental social duties of free men in civilized life.” Olmstead was a famous landscape architect who would go on to design Central Park, Niagara Reservation at Niagara Falls, Biltmore Estate, and many other prestigious grounds. The Port Royal Experiment was an essential plan that offered newly freed slaves an education and a chance to work and live independently of white control. The freedmen’s Bureau was established to help former slaves succeed in their new way of life.

At the suggestion of General Sherman, the US Congress confiscated a strip of coastal land from Charleston to Florida. President Abraham Lincoln issued new land distribution policies that saw 40,000 acres of this land divided between freed families. They were allowed to purchase up to 40 acres of land for $1.25 per acre. Excess army mules were redistributed to the new property owners. It is thought that this was the origin of the slogan “40 acres and a mule.” White northerners were also allowed to buy land, creating tenant farming.

Hilton Head Island’s Fish Hall Plantation became the site of Mitchelville. This image was taken in 1862 by Henry Moore.

By January of 1862 Union General Thomas W. Sherman requested teachers to instruct the freed men, women, and children. Later that year, the Port Royal Experiment began. This radical program created schools and hospitals for the freedmen. It also allowed them to purchase and run abandoned plantations. 53 missionaries from the New England Freedmen’s Aid Society volunteered during this humanitarian crisis. Skilled teachers, ministers and doctors travelled south to teach life skills and religious studies. Two pivotal initiatives that paved the way for Reconstruction were begun in the Lowcountry – Mitchelville and Penn School.

Freedmen gather at Penn School to learn to read and write along with other skills.

Laura Towne was dispatched from Pennsylvania with funds to create the Penn School, one of the largest schools created during the experiment. She and fellow educator Ellen Murray established an educational mission on St. Helena Island called Penn School. This was the first school for former slaves of the sea islands. The first classes were held at Oak Plantation, then when enrollment increased, they moved to Brick Church. A school was built adjacent to the church and a complex developed around it which served as a center for the St. Helena Island Gullah community. Along with teaching literacy, the school provided training for midwives, a health care clinic, and the state’s first day care center for black children.

Rev. Jesse Jackson; Joan Baez; Ira Sandperl; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; and Dora McDonald on the Penn Center campus in 1964. Photo credit: Bob Fitch

The Penn Center took on a new role during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. In those days there were only a handful of safe havens for black leaders to gather. Civil Rights activists, including Martin Luther King, Jr. spent a significant amount of time on the Penn Center campus. Dr. King and other influential civil rights activists were able to meet and strategize on the beautiful campus. The spot also served as a retreat for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The Penn Center campus was designated a National Historic Monument in 1974. The center is still a vital part of the community. History and culture are preserved in the center’s museum, outreach programs and educational experiences.

The community of Mitchelville was planned and built in 1862.

The wartime Department of the South was headquartered on Hilton Head Island. Union General Ormsby Mitchel granted Hilton Head freedmen permission to develop the town of Mitchelville in 1862. This was the creation of the first all-black, self-governing community in the country. Government and missionary efforts provided blacks of Mitchelville with education, religion and promoted self-reliance. While learning new skills, the citizens of Mitchelville were able to thrive and continue their Gullah customs and culture.  By 1865 Mitchelville had 1,500 inhabitants. They built the First African Baptist Church. Homes were built on quarter-acre lots, where the new inhabitants could grow produce in their own gardens.  General Mitchel died from yellow fever, just six weeks after arriving in Mitchelville.

Freedwomen and children began a new way of life in Mitchelville.

Mitchelville became a fully functioning town, complete with a mayor, councilmen, a treasurer, and other officers who oversaw every aspect of the town. The town boasted three churches, two schools, a store, cotton gin and grist mill. Mitchelville also passed the first compulsory education law in the state, requiring all children between 6 and 15 to be educated in school. The town stretched over 200 acres along the shore of the Atlantic. The major source of employment was the US Army Headquarters. After the war, jobs disappeared with the withdrawal of the US Army. This sent freedmen away from Mitchelville in pursuit of employment. The property that Mitchelville occupied was returned to the previous owners during the Johnson administration. They chose to sell the land to anyone that was interested in purchasing, including former Mitchelville citizens. Most of the land was bought by Freedman March Gardner. The land was later divided amongst heirs and the town no longer appeared on maps by the early 20th century. Most of the land was eventually sold to the Hilton Head Company and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. The site is preserved as the Historic Mitchelville Freedom Park. The park serves as a Reconstruction Era heritage site. The park features exhibits, signature events and guided tours.

Freedmen harvest cotton.

The death of Abraham Lincoln on April 15,1865 ended the momentum for the Port Royal Experiment. President Andrew Johnson worked to restore all lands to their previous owners. Many freedmen that bought land witnessed it returned to its former owners. Sharecropping quickly began to creep onto the scene. Not all black landowners lost their land. Many were able to retain ownership of their purchased properties because they were not reclaimed by the previous owners. By 1868, the Freedmen’s Bureau was completely dismantled. Momentum for the Port Royal Experiment began to diminish with the new administration. The Reconstruction Era ended in 1877. Although it was a brief period in American history, it marked a significant chapter in the history of civil rights in the United States.

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Are you ready to celebrate the season? Our March calendar is busy.

March is upon us and so are all the festivities that come with it! The Lowcountry is busy with festivals and activities to keep us entertained all month.

Bluffton Artisan Market

Bluffton will be starting off the month’s festivities with the inaugural Bluffton Night Bazaar held under the twinkling lights of the Burnt Church Distillery courtyard. This new monthly event features local artisans, live music, food & drink.

Bluffton Charities Oyster Roast

The Beaufort Charities Oyster Roast is just a few days away, on March 5th at Live Oaks Park in Port Royal.  In its 17th year, the Oyster Roast features all you can eat Beaufort oysters from 1-8 pm. Entertainment will be provided by local bands The Entertainers and Steel Rail Express. The event also includes premium micro-brews, a full day children’s program, live auctions, and local vendors offering varied fairs.

Walterboro History, Arts & Music Festival

Walterboro is excited to announce the return of the Walterboro History, Arts & Music Festival. This festival celebrates local history along with visual and performing arts added into the mix. Artists, performers, reenactors, storytellers, musicians and more entertain the crowds that come from near and far. The festival will be held in various locations throughout Walterboro, March 7-12.

Beaufort History Museum Revolutionary War Events

The Beaufort History Museum will host two Revolutionary War events March
11-12, 2022, as part of its anticipation of the 250th anniversary of the war in 2026.
On Friday, March 11, 2:00-3:00 p.m., at the St. Helena Island Public Library, 6355 Jonathan
Francis Sr. Rd., Rita Elliott will discuss the Battle of Purrysburg, S.C., and later
archaeological dig discoveries made at the battle site.
On Saturday, March 12, 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., at the Beaufort History Museum, 713 Craven
St., re-enactors from the 5th Company, 4th South Carolina Regiment will conduct a live-fire
demonstration with period artillery. The team will be set up in the walled Arsenal Courtyard and provide a unique educational opportunity for visitors of all ages. Live cannon demonstrations are planned at 30-minute intervals throughout the day starting at 10:30 AM. Both events are free and open to the public.

Pinnacle Bank Hilton Head Shamrock 5k

Dust off your green because the Hilton Head Island St. Patrick’s Day Celebration is BACK!! It’s time to turn out for South Carolina’s oldest St Patrick’s Day Parade. Kick off your St. Patrick’s Day Celebration on Hilton Head Island during the 27th Annual Pinnacle Bank Hilton Head Shamrock 5K. Hilton Head’s Annual “Running of the Green” will be held on Saturday morning March 12th at 7:30am.

Hilton Head St. Patrick's Day

Next on the agenda is the Hilton Head St. Patrick’s Day Weekend. Come view the 2nd Annual Boat Parade as it cruises down Broad Creek, followed by an Irish concert at Lowcountry Celebration Park. The parade is the grand finale! It will proudly march down Pope Avenue Sunday, March 13th at 3pm.

Sham Rocked Sip & Stroll 2022

Join Beaufort March 12th in historic downtown as they celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in a fun way! The Sham Rocked Sip & Stroll 2022 offers several ticket options from 10am – 2pm. Each attendee receives a Sip & Stroll t-shirt, swag bag, and access to all the goodie stations spread throughout downtown Beaufort. Goodie stations will feature either a cocktail, something yummy or something swag for you to have during your stroll. Downtown merchants will be open for shopping during or after the stroll. Restaurants will be featuring lunch and dinner specials as well! So grab your gal pals, friends, family, or significant other for a fun filled day in downtown Beaufort during the Sip & Stroll!

Hardeeville's Lowcountry Pow Wow and Cultural Festival

Soak up some local culture at Hardeeville’s Lowcountry Pow Wow and Cultural Festival March 12-13th. Millstone Landing is the backdrop for this festival that sets out to educate the public about Native Americans. It also creates a gathering place for Native people to celebrate their culture. The event features Aztec dancing, drumming, arts & crafts, native campsites, demonstrations, food and much more.

Beaufort Annual St. Patrick's Day Festival

Beaufort’s Town Center will be the site for their Annual St. Patrick’s Day Festival. This outdoor event will showcase a variety of wholesome activities for people of all ages. The 4th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Festival at Beaufort Town Center is a free, family-fun celebration benefiting the Beaufort Area Hospitality Association. The event will take place on Saturday, March 19 from 12-4pm. Area restaurants and food trucks will be selling food and drinks and there will be live entertainment including a bagpipe player, local music, and much more! This family-fun event will have activities for all ages! We will also have festive drinks available for the adults!

Hilton Head Wine and Food Festival

The Hilton Head Wine & Food Festival takes place the last week of March. This week-long celebration combines the fruits of global wine partnerships, signature Lowcountry cuisine, grassroots cultural happenings, and the authentic fabric of a unique community. Join us as we celebrate the 36th anniversary of this annual Hilton Head Island rite of passage. Experience for yourself this year’s schedule of events including spectacular celebrity chef showcases, intriguing wine education sessions, live entertainment and of course the famed Grand and Public Tasting events.

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2022 All Saints Garden Tour 33 years strong!

All Saints Garden Tour

SC Lowcountry Visitors Guide – 33rd Annual All Saints Garden Tour
We’re back- the 33rd Annual All Saints Garden Tour on Saturday, May 21, 2022, has
something for everyone: gardens of various sizes; most are located on the water; designed and
maintained by professional landscapers while others were lovingly created by the owners;
newly created or nurtured for many years; and stunning views! This self-guided tour from 9:00
a.m. to 3:00 p.m.(note we are starting and ending earlier) includes six distinctive gardens, all
of which are new to the Tour, located in four different gated communities on Hilton Head
Island and in Bluffton. Your $35 ticket includes the Tour and in view of the uncertainties Covid
has created, there will be no lunch, boutique, or bake sale at All Saints Episcopal Church this
year. A Master Gardener to answer questions will be located in one of the gardens! In 2019
the tickets sold out, so get them early! Tickets are available on line at
www.allsaintsgardentour.com and are available at garden centers and other businesses in
Hilton Head and Bluffton- hope you have been seeing the Garden Tour poster with the colorful
red geraniums. All net proceeds are given to smaller, 501c3 charities that focus on hunger,
homelessness, literacy and/or aging.

Blue Heron Sanctuary

Blue Heron Sanctuary
Moss Creek
A new garden professionally designed and installed in 2017 has been added to by the
plant collector owner. It focuses on the natural beauty of Blue Heron Sanctuary and
Rookery. The backyard beds were created to enhance the view of the Sanctuary and
include a unique assortment of plants which provides year round interest with multiple
blooming plants each season.

Moss Creek

Oh, the stories it could tell
Moss Creek
A recently renovated home has an expansive marsh view and holds a surprise behind
the home. The Angel Oak may be between 300-400 years old, measured 92 inches in
diameter last year. On the list of 150 largest and oldest trees in Beaufort County, it
creates a sanctuary for the owners.

Serendipity at Port Royal

Serendipity
Port Royal
An esteemed garden design of LAISSEZ FAIRE certainly had no grand master plan here
where frivolity rules! This plot of vegetative eccentricity is entirely maintained by the
owners with some assistance from Mother Nature’s landscape architects. Reflective of
the owners’ travels and whimsical natures, these gardens can be described
as Unique! Eclectic! Quirky!

Ocean Breeze Gardens in Port Royal

Ocean Breeze Gardens
Port Royal
Professionally designed, stunning, structured beachfront property with multiple
outdoor living areas describes this garden. Accented with pops of seasonal color, an
assortment of lush greenery defines various settings for relaxing, enjoying the ocean,
contemplating nature and recreation activities including a basketball court, swimming
pool, bocce ball court and a putting green.

DIY Gardens Indigo Run

DIY Gardens
Indigo Run
Do-it-yourself gardeners created a charming, relaxing environment by installing
flagstone and paver paths, patios, fences, raised beds, fountains, pots (they really like
pots), benches, a large pergola! These handsome hardscapes enhance a shimmering
lagoon view of herons, ducks, turtles and, of course, alligators and are complimented
by a charming assortment of Low Country plants .

Tranquility Gardens at Hilton Head Plantation

Tranquility Gardens
Hilton Head Plantation
Low country surroundings inspired a newly renovated landscape with four distinct
design styles including an expansive walkway with a fountain, a perennial flower
cutting garden, a formal boxwood hedge in a Charleston Garden which transitions to a
poolside tropical oasis with tons of annual color! There’s a layered living screen
designed for its beauty and privacy.

Tranquility Gardens

Over the years, more than $500,000 has been given to local charities from this annual event
bringing validation to our logo “Through the Beauty of a Garden ….. A Gift to the Community”.
All who attend the 2022 Garden Tour add to this legacy. For tickets and updated information
please visit our website allsaintsgardentour.com or call (843)681-8333.

All Saints Gardens

Sidebar – How to go to the Tour:
Tickets are available on line at www.allsaintsgardentour.com and if ordered by May 6, they
will be mailed to you. Tickets ordered on line after May 6 through midnight Thursday, May 19
need to be picked up from All Saints Episcopal Church between 10-3:30 Monday -Thursday or
on May 20 or the day of the Tour.
Tickets can be purchased at All Saints Episcopal Church, and garden centers and other
businesses in Hilton Head and Bluffton for cash or check through 10 am Friday, May 20.
If tickets remain, they can be purchased the day of the Tour at All Saints Episcopal Church at
3001 Meeting Street from 8:30-noon. For tickets and updated information, please visit our
website or call (843)681-8333. Tickets not picked up by noon on May 21, 2022 are forfeited.
Participants need to be able to safely walk on flagstone pathways and through gardens.

Submitted by Nancy Renner, nnrenner@outlook.com.

Gardens of South Carolina Lowcountry
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Camping in the Lowcountry

Fall is the perfect time for a camping trip to the South Carolina Lowcountry.

Fall temperatures in the South Carolina Lowcountry are perfect for spending time in nature. The cool mornings, mild days and campfire-worthy evenings are ideal for camping.  Spending time outdoors is a wonderful way to escape the grind and recharge the batteries!

Water activities - camping in the lowcountry

Is summer heat too much for you? Do mosquitoes and no-see-ums send you running for the door? Fall is the perfect time for you! Reservations are easier to find after Labor Day when schools are back in session. Temperatures cool, humidity drops, and pesky biting insects begin to disappear.

bike trails - camping in the lowcountry
Load the bikes and head to Pinckney Island to spend the day.
Image by SC Lowcountry Tourism Commission.

Three state parks in the Lowcountry have camping facilities. Private campgrounds are also located across the area. While some are designed as destinations, others are perfect for a short stop during a long haul. Campgrounds located along I-95 are great for using as a hub to visit all the major attractions across the Lowcountry.

canoeing - camping in the lowcountry
Canoe or kayak at Sargent Jasper Park, located beside Camp Lake Jasper in Hardeeville.
Image by SC Lowcountry Tourism Commission.

Beaufort County

Hunting Island State Park is the South Carolina’s most popular state park. The campground is located at the northern end of the island. The campground has 100 campsites with water and electrical hookups, shower and restroom facilities, beach walkways and a playground.

Enjoy the many miles of walking trails that wind throughout the park. Climb the state’s only publicly accessible lighthouse. Ascend the 167 steps for a panoramic view 130 feet above the beach and maritime forest. The park also has a fishing pier and visitors can borrow gear from the Nature Center.

Hunting Island State Park camping reservations must be made for a minimum of two nights.  To make a camping reservation or view current rates, call toll-free 1-866-345-7275, or visit our reservations page by clicking here. Rates vary by season and demand and are subject to change. The campground is pet-friendly, but there are restrictions.
2555 Sea Island Pkwy., Hunting Island, SC 29920

 

Tuc in the Wood Campground and RV Park is located not too far away on St. Helena Island, one of the Lowcountry’s most beautiful islands. The campground has 80 RV and tent sites with water and electrical hookups. There’s also a bathhouse with hot showers and restroom facilities.

Cast your line in the stocked, freshwater fishing pond. Visit nearby Penn Center, Chapel of Ease, and Fort Fremont. Travel 12 miles to Hunting Island State Park or drive to downtown Beaufort. Cable TV hookup and Wi-Fi are available. The campground is also pet-friendly. Make your reservations by calling 843-838-2267. Questions and inquiries can be emailed to tuckinthewood@islc.net

Hilton Head Harbor RV Resort & Marina is a luxury RV resort located on the north end of Hilton Head Island. The 200-site waterfront, pet friendly resort offers landscaped sites with concrete pads, excellent dining, top-notch amenities, on-site water sports activities and more. The resort has two swimming pools, hot tubs, sun deck, gazebo, saunas, and tennis courts.

The on-site marina is the perfect spot to book water sports including jet skis, kayaks, paddle boards, dolphin tours and more. Fish on the pier or launch your boat from the ramp. The property also boasts a 5-Star restaurant. Call 843-681-3256 or visit Hilton Head Harbor RV Resort & Marina for more information. 43 Jenkins Rd, Hilton Head Island, SC

 

Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort is aluxury camping destination located on the south end of the island. Guests are provided with the ultimate getaway experience. 400 spacious and charming sites are available to accommodate most motorcoach needs, with full hook-ups, cable TV, Wi-Fi, and excellent amenities. The Resort has spots available to rent or own, including scenic lake front sites, private shaded forest sites, and clubhouse sites that place you steps away from the excitement. The resort is located just one mile from beaches, popular restaurants, and unique shops.

The resort offers an array of amenities including a pool, spa, tennis courts, pickleball courts, dog park and full laundry facilities. Between area attractions and resort events, you’ll always have something fun to do during your stay. Call 843-785-7699 or visit Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort for more information. 133 Arrow Road, Hilton Head Island, SC

Colleton County

Edisto Beach State Park has both oceanfront and salt marsh camp sites. There are 112 sites with water and electrical hookups. Tent campers can choose a site with hookups or a more rustic site at the park’s Live Oak Campground. All sites are conveniently located close to public restrooms with hot showers.  The park also has furnished cabins that sit nestled in the woods. The Edisto Beach State Park Campground is pet friendly, but dogs are not allowed in the cabins or cabin area. Dogs must be always kept on a leash. Fishing is allowed along the ocean or salt marsh. Flounder, whiting, spot tail bass and other saltwater fish can be caught in the park. A boat ramp and dock can be found at the park for fishing in Big Bay Creek.

On warm fall days, spend the day at the beach. Walk along the surf to search for seashells and shark’s teeth. Hike, bike or bird watch along the trails, beach, and maritime forest. The trails are comprised of a series of short, mostly level paths that wind through Edisto Island’s maritime forest of live oak, hanging Spanish moss, and palmetto trees. During your walk you may see white-tailed deer, osprey, or alligators, and may even catch a glimpse of the wary bobcats. To make a camping reservation or view current rates, call toll-free 1-866-345-7275 or visit the reservations page by clicking here. Rates vary by season and demand and are subject to change. Camping reservations must be made for a minimum of two nights. 8377 State Cabin Rd, Edisto Island, SC



Colleton State Park is a paddler’s paradise This Lowcountry park sits a short distance from I-95 and connects to Givhan’s Ferry State Park via 23 miles of blackwater river. Colleton State Park provides easy access to the Edisto River, one of the longest free flowing, blackwater rivers in the country, and serves as the headquarters for the Edisto River canoe and kayak trail. Other amenities at Colleton include an easy nature trail, a campground, picnic shelters and ballfields. The main roads at the park and in the campground are paved.

Each site is packed sand and has individual water and electrical hookups. Some sites accommodate RVs up to 40 feet, others up to 25 feet. The campground is convenient to restrooms with hot showers. To make a camping reservation or view current rates, call toll-free 1-866-345-7275 or visit our reservations page by clicking here. Rates vary by season and demand and are subject to change. Camping reservations must be made for a minimum of two nights. 147 Wayside Lane, Walterboro, SC

If you are a true adventurer and want to get off the grid for a while, grab a canoe from Carolina Heritage Outfitters and paddle to your very own treehouse. Located on the halfway point along a 23-mile canoe trip, the Carolina Heritage Outfitters Treehouses are truly off the beaten path. Camp in style with no electricity. Oil candles and tiki torches light the night.  Use the propane stove or grill to prepare your meals. The only running water you’re going to find here is in the river. Bring a cooler of provisions to put in the furnished kitchen. Bring a sleeping bag to place on the bed. An outhouse is provided for your convenience.

Meet the team in the morning to shuttle upriver. Paddle 13 miles to your treehouse. Each treehouse is constructed of local materials and tucked away along the riverbank. Swim in the river. Hike the woodland trails. Then warm yourself by the fire pit.  After a good night’s rest, paddle the remaining 10 miles to finish off the trip at the outpost. While on the river, be on the lookout for Great blue herons, owls, egrets, wood storks, pileated woodpeckers, wood ducks, wild turkey, deer, muskrats and raccoon. Visit Carolina Heritage Outfitters website or call 843-563-5051 for more information. 1 Livery Lane, St. George, SC

New Green Acres is a full featured campground, able to accommodate the full range of RV dimensions or types. This is a great place to pull in and spend the night while on the way to other adventures. The campground is located on I-95 and has 106 sites with the longest and widest pull-thru sites east of the Mississippi. Water and electrical hook-ups are available, as well as cable and wireless internet.

Cool off in the swimming pool. Take the kids to the playground or play with your furry friend in the dog park. Visit New Green Acres website or call 843-538-3450, 800-474-3450 for more information or to book a stay.
396 Campground Road, Walterboro, SC 29488

Givhan’s Ferry State Park is a natural retreat in the Lowcountry woods. The park sits at the end of the 23-mile long stretch of Edisto River kayaking paradise known as the Edisto River kayak and canoe trail that begins at Colleton State Park. The Edisto River is the longest free-flowing blackwater river in North America. Rent a cabin, bring an RV or tent to this beautiful state park. Full-service camping sites are available with water and electrical hookup. Some sites are hike in only. They are also complete with water and electricity. Grills, fire pits, picnic tables and storage boxes are provided at each site. Clean restrooms with hot showers are centrally located. Hike the trails or bring a kayak and explore the river. 

To make a camping reservation call toll-free 1-866-345-7275 or visit our reservations page by clicking here. Rates vary by season and demand and are subject to change.
Camping reservations must be made for a minimum of two nights. Pets are not allowed in the cabins or the cabin areas. Pets are allowed in most other outdoor areas provided they are kept under physical restraint or on a leash not longer than six feet. 746 Givhans Ferry Road, Ridgeville, SC


Jasper County

Come to the Point South KOA. Unwind at this 5 star retreat located conveniently just off I-95, near Savannah, Charleston, Hilton Head and Beaufort.  Visitors have the choice of RV, tent, or cabin sites. Explore the estates, museums, and beaches of the Lowcountry. You may even choose to stay on site and enjoy the many amenities and serene setting. Glamp in a fully stocked deluxe lodge. Some are even crafted from authentic railroad cars!   Enjoy this walk in, walk out experience in place of a hotel. Family fun begins as you check in and check out our activities, like gem mining, backpacks to color, as well as kerchiefs for the pups, a large pool and good old-fashioned fun with tether ball, corn hole, horseshoes, life size chess set and Jenga game at the expanded playground.

There is a large dog walk plus a Kamp K9 for our 4-legged friends. Unwind with a glass of wine from regional wineries. Our newest addition is our own crafted beer from a local brewery. Our own Aria’s Ale is on tap at our full-line Swimming Mermaid Coffee House, which has a full selection of custom roast coffees, latte’s, iced coffees, hot tea and more. Relax and enjoy made-to-order pizza and wings, delivered to your site.  Unwind in our Coffee House & wine bar, where we feature a full line of locally roasted coffees as well as a full array of wines. Book reservations by visiting koa.com. Call 843-726-5733 or 800-562-2948 for more information.


Experience the beauty, relaxation, and the perks of nature at The Oaks at Point South RV Resort. Within 45 minutes of this Lowcountry RV camp, you’ll find attractions like Hilton Head, historic Savannah, Georgia, and the Atlantic Ocean. This campground also boasts a convenient location near Interstate 95, allowing guests to enjoy everything the South Carolina Lowcountry has to offer.

Back at the resort, guests can look forward to an array of activities. Test your hand at mini golf, go for a swim, enjoy fishing, or hit the trails for a hike. Fall activities include Halloween trick or treating and a Thanksgiving potluck. They’re pet friendly as well, so don’t forget your four-legged friends! Call 843-726-5728, or 1-800-388-7788 or visit thousandtrails.com for more information and to book reservations. 1292 Campground Road, Yemassee, SC

Camp Lake Jasper is conveniently located just minutes off of Interstate 95 at Exit 8 in Hardeeville. This brand new resort is convenient to Hilton Head and the historic cities of Bluffton, Beaufort and Savannah. Wake to the sounds of nature beckoning you to explore the park. Hike the pristine trails, paddle the clear waters, play the challenging “Sarge” disc golf course, or simply relax in the lakeside pool and amenity center. Do as much or as little as you like.


Spend the day golfing, shopping, dining, or enjoying the beach and then return for a relaxing night by the campfire. Whether its adventure you seek or escaping the hustle and bustle of everyday life, Camp Lake Jasper is the place for you. Reserve your site today and let the memories begin. 44 Camp Lake Drive, Hardeeville, SC


For more information about the South Carolina Lowcountry visit SouthCarolinaLowcountry.com.

 

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Historic Mitchelville Freedom Park

The Lowcountry’s newest Reconstruction Era National Site

Historic Mitchelville Freedom Park has joined five other sites throughout the state to be recognized on the Reconstruction Era National Register. The park provides educational and historical interpretation related to the Reconstruction Era, 1861-1900. Mitchelville is especially important in the history of freedom towns that were established during Reconstruction.

During the 1861 Battle of Port Royal Hilton Head Island became headquarters for the Union Army. A military order was issued that freed the slaves on the Sea Islands. Former slaves and their children fled the plantations and sought protection with the Union army. They were hired as carpenters, blacksmiths, launderers, coopers, clerks, and cooks.  General Ormsby Mitchel set aside a large parcel of land along the coastline for the newly freed population. Quarter-acre lots and building materials were dispersed for the building of homes. Freedmen elected officials and created a system of law. They built churches, stores, and a school system. All children between the ages of six and fifteen were educated. Men were recruited for the on-going Civil War. They built Fort Howell to protect Mitchelville. This was often called the Port Royal Experiment.

After the Emancipation Proclamation liberated all slaves on January 1, 1863, Mitchelville became a model for future freedmen towns that were created during Reconstruction. At one time, Mitchelville was home to over 3,000 residents. After the Union army left the island in 1868, Mitchelville’s population began to decrease. When the army left, so did many of the jobs that were given to the freedmen. As time went on, residents took apart their houses and moved inland to farm and participate in local commerce. The town remained until the end of the century. Many of the descendants of Mitchelville citizens still live on the island.

­­­According to exploremitchelville.org, “Mitchelville is one of the most significant African-American archaeological sites in the Southeast. It is one of the few that is nearly intact and offers the potential to learn even more about the lives of the early freedmen. It provides another perspective to previous studies of the “Port Royal Experiment.” The presence of Mitchelville also provides evidence of the ability of blacks to govern, educate, and care for themselves absent the bonds of slavery.” A portion of the original Mitchelville site has been protected and placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Visitors can come to the Freedom Park and experience exhibits that show how this town once existed and prospered. Learn about Fort Howell and the 32nd United States Colored Infantry that built it.

Mitchelville Freedom Park is located at 226 Beach City Road on Hilton Head Island. It is open during daylight houses. For information on exhibits, tours, programs, and events visit https://exploremitchelville.org/. For information on other Hilton Head attractions visit https://southcarolinalowcountry.com/hilton-head-island-area/ .

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Life in the fast lane

Hilton Head Island’s long anticipated new outdoor, family-friendly attraction: GoKarts at Hilton Head is open!

Located at the re-branded Adventure Hilton Head @ Broad Creek Marina, these high performance, driver-friendly electric karts will certainly be this summer’s big attraction. Adventure Hilton Head (previously Broad Creek Marina Adventures), in the heart of HHI, has been offering thrills to the community since 2012 when the vastly popular ZipLine Hilton Head opened. The high flying guided ecotour of 7 ziplines including the dual cable racing zip finale was followed by Aerial Adventure’s 6 rope challenge courses in 2016, offering 4 levels of ability and maneuvering through 50 fun obstacles.

Rounding out the perfect HHI destination is the ever-popular, outdoor waterfront dining at the Marina’s Up the Creek Pub & Grill with its new waterfront partner, Paddles! food truck. The excitement for GoKarts at Hilton Head had reached a roar, and now, it will be the perfect summer destination. The double and single carts are equipped with advanced safety features that allow drivers approximately age 8 and above. The doubles will let children approximately age 3 and above join the driver for fast fun. The track will have attendants at all times and will be continuously sanitized. Height and weight guidelines are still to be determined during the final permitting processes.

GoKart HH prices will be about $15 per ride on this exhilarating track with various packages available for repeat riders. In addition, specially priced packages will be available when also zipping and climbing and swinging and flying and jumping on the other challenge activities. Check myadventurehiltonhead.com. Roger Freedman, owner of Adventure Hilton Head, Broad Creek Marina and Up the Creek, Adventure Hilton Head is that welcomed addition for both tourists and locals.

We have to thank the Town staff and the passionate community for their continual support of this project which had its own curves along the way,” commented Freedman. General Manager Nate Jones added, “I grew up here and now am raising a family here. Our adventure park expansion will be the perfect playground for young and not so young. We can’t wait to enjoy kids’ laughter again.” In addition, to driving and flying at Adventure Hilton Head, the adjacent Broad Creek Marina offers loads of water activities including kayaking, skiff tours, parasailing, jet skis, dolphin tours and charter boats. See Broadcreekmarinahh.com for details. Online reservations are strongly recommended.

See myadventurehiltonhead.com for details on available times, pricing and restrictions. — For further information, contact: Pam Freedman pgfreedman@aol.com (860)559-6030.

For information on other Hilton Head adventures visit https://southcarolinalowcountry.com/hilton-head-island-area/.

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Let’s Get Pickin’ – Local produce can be found across the Lowcountry

Farm Fresh Produce in the SC Lowcountry

 

Farm fresh local produce can be found during the spring and summer months throughout the SC Lowcountry. From u-pick farms, to produce stands and farmers markets, seasonal produce is abundant in our neck of the woods!

 

 

U-Pick

Beaufort County

You can find Dempsey Farms on the way to Hunting Island State Park, Harbor and Fripp Islands. The farm has various produce throughout the seasons, starting with strawberries in April.  They are a working family farm growing produce for the last sixty years. For a farm fresh experience stop by and pick with us. Follow their Facebook page to see what is available.

1576 Sea Island Pkwy.
St Helena Island, SC 29920
843-838-3656

Bluffton’s Okatee River Farms has a great selection of local fruit and produce. This small family farm is located 1/2 mile from 278 in Bluffton, SC. They grow tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, okra, peppers and strawberries. April and May is the perfect time to stop by for u-pick strawberries. Follow their Facebook page to see what’s available.

1921 Okatie Hwy.
Okatie SC
843-206-5023

Colleton County

 Breland Hill Farm is a multigenerational family farm raising fruits, vegetables, and much more! A market is located in Ruffin. Housed in a repurposed tobacco barn, they grow, process, and sell all of their farm products here. U-pick strawberry fields are also located here. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s in season.

849 Spence Dr.
Ruffin, SC 29475
843-866-7560 Call for hours of operation.

 

 

Shop at the Farm

 

Beaufort County

Morning Glory Homestead is a family farm on St. Helena Island, which uses sustainable agriculture methods to feed the community. This small family farm began as a homestead for a family of seven. Visitors to the farm can buy seasonal produce, bakery items, eggs and honey. You can also call to schedule a farm tour. The tour includes the rich history of the Gullah community.

For more information visit their blog.

Mon – Fri:  By Appointment
42 Robert & Clara Trail
St. Helena Island, SC
843-812-0344

Bluffton’s Okatee River Farms has a great selection of local fruit and produce. They currently have u-pick strawberries. They are also currently planting sunflowers for harvest. They also have seasonal fruit and veggies throughout the year. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s in season.

1921 Okatie Hwy.
Okatie SC
843-206-5023

Colleton

Kindlewood Farms was born from the interest in the age old techniques of grafting and a passion to create quality, sustainable produce. We are dedicated to producing high quality heirloom tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, okra, corn, squash, cucumbers, watermelon, and cantaloupe. We also grow grafted heirloom tomato plants and grafted cucurbits. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s in season and where to find them.

kindlewood.farms@gmail.com
(843)302-2312

Jasper County

If you are in Jasper County and looking for fresh eggs, look no farther than Earleah Plantation. Call for more information or to order and pick up fresh eggs.
843-540-2200,  earleahvintageglass@gmail.com

Whipporwhill Farms is a40-acre small family farm offering fresh chicken, rabbit and pork as well as fresh eggs and seasonal veggies. Come to the farm Monday, Wednesday or Sunday to shop on site, or find them at the Hilton Head Farmers Market at Coastal Discovery Museum on Tuesdays. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s in stock.

870 Tillman Road
Ridgeland, SC
843-473-5231

Hampton County

Murdaugh Farms is a family-owned and operated farm offering a large variety of produce throughout the year. Some of the produce offered include the well-known Hampton County watermelons, squash (several varieties), cucumbers, zucchini, corn, red potatoes and other varieties of potatoes, okra, carrots, collard greens and many other types of produce. As produce becomes available, it will be posted on the Facebook page. We sell our produce both to the wholesale and retail markets as well as to individual buyers looking for just enough for a meal or two.

22603 Pocotaligo Road
Early Branch, SC
803-942-3814

Drawdy Farms is a family-owned business, selling fresh locally grown fruits and veggies. Their produce stand is open year around, with whatever is in season at the time. We proudly serve the low country and support local farmers. Join their Facebook page for weekly updates!

2598 Hopewell Rd
Brunson, SC

 

The Port Royal Farmer’s Market is open Saturdays, from 9 am-noon, rain or shine. You will find fresh, local, seasonal produce, shrimp, oysters, poultry, beef, pork, eggs, bread and cheese. If you have a green thumb, look for plants, ferns, camellias, azaleas, citrus trees and beautiful, fresh cut flower bouquets. Check out the fabulous prepared food vendors serving BBQ, dumplings, she crab soup, crab cakes, paella, coffee, baked goods, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Find them at the Port Royal Naval Heritage Park at the intersection of Ribaut Road and Pinckney Blvd.

The Bluffton Farmers Market is open Thursdays, from 12-5 pm. Come find fresh, locally grown vegetables, fruits, flowers, plants and herbs at the Farmers Market of Bluffton. Gather with locals and tourists at this weekly community event to buy excellent produce, enjoy delicious food, listen to entertainment, and relax with friends. Located in historic downtown Bluffton along Calhoun and Lawrence Streets and through Carson Cottages, this family friendly market showcases local growers, local food vendors, local entertainment, local community causes and local information about the Bluffton area. Find them at 71 Green Street in historic Bluffton.

Come to the Hilton Head Island Farmers Market at Coastal Discovery Museum and take home fresh produce, chicken, rabbit, pork, seafood, salsa, fresh sausage, beef, meals to cook, cookies, breads, she crab soup and much more! The market is open every Tuesday from 10-3 in the spring, summer and fall. Hours shorten to 9 am-1 pm in the winter. Shopping at the Hilton Head Farmers Market is about more than getting great food, it is about meeting friends, strengthening the community, and rebuilding the local food economy. Find the Hilton Head Farmers Market on the grounds of Coastal Discovery Museum, 70 Honey Horn Drive, on Hilton Head Island.

The Ridgeland Farmers Market hosts a variety of vendors, including produce, baked goods, prepared meals, arts, crafts and estate sales. The market is located on Main Street in downtown Ridgeland. They are open Fridays, from 1-6 pm.

Hampton Farmers Market – 803-943-2586 Highway 278, Hampton

 

 

Roadside Markets

Beaufort County

Barefoot Farms – 939 Sea Island Parkway St. Helena, SC, (843) 838-7421

Dempsey Farms – 1576 Sea Island Parkway, St. Helena, SC, (843) 838-3656

Four Seasons Produce and Nursery – 1611 Trask Pkwy, Seabrook, SC, (843) 846-2777

Lowcountry Produce – 1919 Trask Pkwy, Seabrook, SC, (843) 846-9438

Pasture Shed Farm – 1083 Sea Island Parkway St. Helena Island, SC, (843) 812-8366

Colleton County

Keegan-Filion Farm – 1475 Keegan Drive, Walterboro, SC, (843) 538-2565

Rizer’s Pork and Produce – 2357 Confederate Hwy., Lodge, SC, (843) 866-2645

Breland Hill Farm 1002 Bells Hwy, Walterboro, SC, (843)5497560

Jasper

Whippoorwhill Farms – 870 Tillman Road, Ridgeland, SC, (843)473-5231

Hampton

Drawdy Farms 2598 Hopewell Rd, Brunson

 

 

Community Supported Agriculture

Beaufort County (Bluffton) – Three Sisters Farm

Colleton – Kindlewood Farms

 

 

Fresh Meat & Seafood

Beaufort

Sea Eagle Market is a family owned and operated retail and wholesale market and catering company located at 2149 Boundary St. in Beaufort. Stop by and pick up soft shell crabs, shrimp and more! Open Monday thru Saturday, from 9 am – 6 pm. For daily information visit their Facebook page. (843)521-5090

Maggioni Oyster Company is South Carolina’s largest provider of premium quality wild-harvested bushels and single oysters. They harvest oysters at low tide, wash off the briny mud, and deliver them directly to their customers. Maggioni Oyster Company first opened on Daufuskie Island in 1883 and later built a cannery in Beaufort. They have been family owned and operated for five generations. Find them at 440 Eddings Point Rd, on St. Helena Island. (912)844-1031

Lady’s Island Oysters specializes in single lady oysters, grown in the clean, crisp waters of the SC Lowcountry. The estuaries that nurture their oysters are filled with pure salt water flowing directly from the Atlantic Ocean. Great pride is taken to nurture oysters from hatchery to harvest. Find them at 35 Hutson Drive, in Seabrook. (843)473-5018

Bluffton

Bluffton Oyster Company has been a family run operation since 1899. The Bluffton Oyster Company actually sits on reclaimed land, built up by more than a hundred years of discarded shells from previous shucking operations. The oyster business thrived in early Bluffton and throughout the 1920’s, with five different oyster operations in the area. Now the Bluffton Oyster Company remains the last hand-shucking house in the state of South Carolina. They specialize in fresh local seafood; oysters, clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, fish filets, soft shell crabs and live blue crabs. Hours of operation are 9 am – 5:30 pm, Monday thru Saturday. You can also purchase fried shrimp, oysters and soft shell crab at the Bluffton Farmers Market on Thursdays. Find them at 63 Wharf St. (843)757-4010

Edisto Island

Flowers Seafood has been commercially fishing and serving fresh, local seafood on Edisto Island for four generations. Come into their family owned seafood market and browse the selection of fresh, wild caught seafood. They have a large selection of fish, shrimp, crabs, and other seafood that comes “fresh  off the boat” daily. If you’re interested in cooked food try their “To-Go”  restaurant located right behind Flowers Seafood Company.  The same fresh seafood is made ready to order. Stop by on your way to Edisto Beach. The market is open Monday-Saturday, from 9 am-6 pm, and Sunday 9 am-5 pm. The Flowers Seafood To-Go Food Truck is open Thursday-Saturday 11 am-7 pm. They are located just six miles from the beach at 1914 Hwy 174, Edisto Island, SC (843)869-0033 (Market), (843)869-3303 (kitchen/to-go orders)

Ridgeland

Fiddler’s Seafood Market and Restaurant is a historical and beloved destination where fresh seafood is enjoyed and homemade goods are shared. Fiddlers gives customers an authentic taste of local, old-fashioned southern comfort. Their seafood is either caught by Fiddler’s owner, Billy Rowell on his very own boat or purchased from local fishermen. Within walking distance of their restaurant is the seafood market, where customers can bring home southern hospitality in its finest form. Fresh produce, homemade baked goods, and local crafts are all created by our own staff, or by the artisans of the Ridgeland, SC community. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s going on in the restaurant and market, or visit for yours self. The restaurant is located at 7738 West Main Street, (843)726-6681. The seafood market is just around the corner at 572 South Green Street, (843)726-6691.

Hampton

Tuten’s Fresh Market Meat and Seafood is Hampton’s finest local butcher shop. This family owned business has been around for over 30 years. Ran by an expert butcher and grill master, Tuten’s is dedicated to delivering the very best meat and freshest seafood, with farm fresh produce and some staple grocery items as well! Come by and see them sometime. They’ll be glad to help you find anything you are looking for as well as give you some great tips for seasoning, marinating, and grilling your meals to perfection. Located at 604 Elm St. in Hampton, (803)943-4670. Visit their Facebook page for daily updates.

 

 

 

 

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Coastal Discovery Museum & Trails

Looking for a place to practice social distancing while enjoying the natural wonder of the South Carolina Lowcountry? The grounds of Coastal Discovery Museum are just what you’re looking for!

Photo by Louli Kourkounakis.

The Coastal Discovery Museum is located on Hilton Head Island. The museum displays permanent and travelling exhibits that focus on the Lowcountry’s natural history and cultural heritage. The museum and its grounds are a part of the Honey Horn property. Interpretive trails wind through the woods and along the marsh and Jarvis Creek.  This is a great place to spend the day while social distancing.

The Coastal Discovery Museum’s Discovery House is located along the main road into Honey Horn. Stop in the museum first to view the exhibits. Admission is free. This building dates back to 1859. It holds both temporary and permanent exhibits that focus on the Lowcountry’s natural history and cultural heritage. There’s also a Kid’s Zone to keep the little ones entertained.

The vistas seen from the trail boardwalks stretch across the marsh and tidal creek. While walking, be on the lookout for interpretive panels that explain the natural beauty of Lowcountry estuaries and marine habitat.

The property is home to several live oak trees that were planted in the early 1800s. You can also find a former state champion Southern Red Cedar tree on the property. This is one of the largest of its kind in the state. The germination date has been estimated at 1595. Bald cypress, Dogwood, Gingko, Southern Magnolia and Pecan trees can also be seen here.

Native American replica shell ring image found on Coastal Discovery Museum Facebook page.

While walking the grounds, be sure to stop at the replica shell ring. Native Americans built similar rings as far back as 4,000 years ago. The exact purpose of these rings is unknown. The Coastal Discovery replica shell ring was built with real Native American oyster, whelk and clam shells, animal bones and other historic materials.

No trip to the Coastal Discovery Museum is complete without touring the Karen Wertheimer Butterfly Habitat. This enclosed greenhouse garden is home to a number of native butterflies from May to October. Nectar plants feed the butterflies while host plants are covered in eggs and feeding caterpillars. Informative panels are placed throughout the garden to educate visitors on the life cycle of the butterfly.

There are many gardens spread across the property. The Carnivorous Plants Bog Garden is home to the Venus fly trap, pitcher plants and sundews. These are all native to South Carolina. These plants expertly trap insects with their unique adaptations. The Heritage Garden features more than 30 plant species that are historically significant to the Lowcountry. Some of these varieties were used by Native Americans, while others were grown by Gullah islanders. Many of these plants are responsible for survival on the barrier islands after the Civil War.  The Camelia Garden contains 131 different types of camellias. Some of the varieties were even developed in the Lowcountry.

Don’t forget to wander over to the barns before you leave. The pole barn was built in the 1950s to store farming and timbering equipment. Look for the 400-pound cowling of an Atlas V rocket that washed up on the beach at Hilton Head in 2010. The horse barn was added in the 1930s. It was renovated by the museum in 2008 and is now home to two Marsh Tacky horses: Comet and Hawk. The Marsh Tacky is the South Carolina State Heritage Horse.

Map from Coastal Discovery Museum website.

For more information on attractions on Hilton Head and the South Carolina Lowcountry visit  https://southcarolinalowcountry.com/sights-to-see/

Coastal Discovery Museum
70 Honey Horn Drive
Hilton Head, SC 29926
843-689-6767

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See what our visitors love about the
SOUTH CAROLINA LOWCOUNTRY

Use the #hashtag #sclowcountry to get your image featured!

The Lowcountry & Resort Islands Region of South Carolina includes the four, southern-most counties in the state, Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton, and Colleton, which are bordered on the east by the Atlantic Ocean and on the west by the Savannah River and the state of Georgia.

Beautiful South Carolina Lowcountry
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#southcarolina #southcarolinacoast #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #lifeonthecoast #coastliving #coastalsouthcarolina #saltyair #saltlife #wildlife #wildlifephotography #spanishmoss #sunrisesunset
simplysoutherncottage keeps us in awe with each her projects. This bed swing refresh is one of our favorites!
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The shore gently recedes beneath the stunning Pawleys Island Pier. The unique island town, located about 25 miles south of Myrtle Beach and 70 miles north of Charleston, exudes laid-back, beachy vibes. Locals have definitely adopted an island state of mind and encourage visitors to as well. When you go, make sure to relax on the beach, explore the famous sand dunes, or fish in one of the many adjacent creeks.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: We guarantee that you’re going to want to spend a whole day here. We recommend getting to the beach at around 10am.🗓️ Best time of the year: Pawleys Island has the best weather during the spring and early summer months.🏖️ Things to do while there: Pawleys Island Nature Park, Pawleys Island Chapel, Hopsewee Plantation.🐠 Things to visit in the area: Brookgreen Gardens (brookgreen_gardens), take a walking ghost tour, Myrtle Beach (mymyrtlebeach), Harborwalk Marina, South Carolina Maritime Museum (southcarolinamaritimemuseum).🏨 Where to stay: The Oceanfront Litchfield Inn (oceanfrontlitchfieldinn), Litchfield Beach and Golf Resort (litchfieldbeachandgolf), Sea View Inn (seaviewinn), 620 Prince (620prince).Photo by qcphotographer
South Carolina Lowcountry
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Headed down the road....Edisto Island.  #edisto #sclowcountry #trees #endofday  #beauty #islandsofsc
Spanish moss drapes the live oak trees that are ubiquitous to the Edisto Island area. Did you know that Edisto gets its name from the native Edistow people? The Edistow Native Americans were a sub tribe of the Cusabo indians, a group of Native Americans who lived along the Atlantic coast in South Carolina.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: Stop by mid-morning. That way you can explore the island, grab lunch, and stay for the amazing sunset if you choose.🏖️ Things to do while there: Edisto Environmental Learning Center, Boneyard Beach, Scott Creek Inlet, Big Bay Creek, SeaCow Eatery.☀️ Things to visit in the area: Jungle Road Park, Bay Creek Park, Otter Islands, Spanish Mount Point.📆 Best time of the year to visit: For warmer weather come anywhere from March-August.🏨 Where to stay: Fripp Island Golf & Beach Resort (frippislandrsrt), Seabrook Island Club (seabrook_sc), The Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort (kiawahresort), Charleston Kiawah Island/Andell Inn (andellinn).Photo by qcphotographer
Reposted from coastaldiscoverymuseum Hilton Head Island has the second highest tidal range on the East Coast, second only to Canada’s Bay of Fundy. The average tidal range here is 7-9 feet between high and low tides.The Salt Marsh is one of our area’s most prominent features, not to mention an essential resource. Most coastal creatures depend partially or even fully on the Salt Marsh for survival as it serves as a nursery, as well as a water filter vital for the functioning of the entire coastal ecosystem.Explore the Lowcountry up close with a visit to the Coastal Discovery Museum and head out into the marsh via the Osprey Outlook floating dock on a self-guided tour or register for the weekly Salt Marsh Discovery program to learn from an expert how and why this particular environment is so important. (843) 689-6767 ext. 223 or coastaldiscovery.org.
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#coastaldiscoverymuseum #honeyhorn #hiltonheadisland #saltmarshsaturday #hightide #lowtide #saltmarsh #ospreyoutlook #boardwalk #floatingdock #ecosystem #exploremore #familyfun #familyadventures #communitymuseum #smithsonianaffiliate #sclowcountry #lowcountrylife #visithiltonhead #discoversc
A visitor takes a leisurely stroke under a canopy of live oaks draped with Spanish moss in the Palmetto Bluff (palmettobluff) neighborhood of Bluffton, South Carolina. Palmetto Bluff is a picturesque community that sits in the heart of Lowcountry. Nestled along the May River, it’s abundant with beautiful walking trails, historic sites, and stunning views.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: There is no wrong time to visit Palmetto Bluff. However, we highly recommend sticking around for one of their spectacular sunsets.🛶 Things to do while there: Stop by Cole’s for some regionally inspired Southern fare, paddle board, kayak, or canoe along the May River, go saltwater fishing, take a tour at Bluffton Jack's Old Town Tours.🌊 Things to visit in the area: Palmetto Bluff Conservancy, Old Town Bluffton, Bluffton Oyster Factory Park, May River Sandbar, Heyward House Museum and Welcome Center (heywardhouse).📆 Best time of the year to visit: For the best weather, we recommend visiting between March and May or from September to November.🏨 Where to stay: The Montage Palmetto Bluff Resort (montagepalmettobluff) is the only resort in Palmetto Bluff. However, there are plenty of places to stay in the surrounding areas including: Old Town Bluffton Inn (oldtownblufftoninn), The Inn & Club at Harbour Town (theinnandclubatharbourtown), Sonesta Resort Hilton Head Island (sonestahhi).Photo by jpgriceoz
South Carolina lowcountry
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📸jonpuckett
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#southcarolina #southcarolinacoast #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #lifeonthecoast #coastliving #coastalsouthcarolina #saltyair #saltlife #wildlife #wildlifephotography #spanishmoss #sunrisesunset #charleston
Discover at your own leisure at the coastaldiscoverymuseum 🌳  From century-old buildings with storied pasts, to wooden boardwalks that stretch into the Jarvis Creek salt marsh, there's always something to explore!
Magnolia Plantation and Gardens
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Thanks for the tag 📸trbtbone
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#magnoliaplantation #southcarolina #southernliving #southernview #southernlife #sclowcountry #scenicviews #charlestonlife #charlestonliving #charlestonsc #coastalsouthcarolina #coastaliving #lifeonthecoast #lifeincharleston #spanishmoss #explorethecoast #exploretheoutdoors #godscreation #getoutside
“Autumn Creek” 12x16, oil on canvas. hortonhayesfineart markkelvinhortonstudio hortonhayesfineartstudio #charlestonsc #sclowcountry #charlestonartist #oilpainting #oiloncanvas #mtpleasantsc #hobcawcreek #artistsoninstagram #marsh #tonalistlandscape #tonalistpainting #limitedpalette
Great adventures await in our SC Lowcountry!Plan your trip today.https://southcarolinalowcountry.com/#thatsmylowcountry #naturallyamazing #sclowcountry #beaufortcountysc #colletoncountysc #hamptoncountysc #jaspercountysc #greatadventuresawait
Riding into the weekend like...Isn't this live oak tree tunnel beautiful? Live oak, draped in Spanish moss, is emblematic of South Carolina and many of the Southern states. We love these iconic trees, not only for their beauty, but their history as well. The average lifespan of a live oak is 300 years!Photo by qcphotographer
Need a project this weekend? Add a splash of color and touch of gardening to your porch decor. Don’t have a green thumb? Not to worry.⠀
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Visit southernlivingplantcollection for great tips, inspiration, and even purchase your plants on-line!⠀
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📸  southernlivingmag ⠀
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#homedecor #curbappeal #frontdoor #garden #southernliving #slhomes #bloom #welocome #updateyourlook #realtor #realestate #porchlife #lowcountryliving #charleston #charlestonsc #southcarolina #discoversc #sclowcountry #explorecharleston #summervillesc #lovewhereyoulive #jimbrantleyrealtor
“Beaufort River Sunset”
Digital Drawing in Adobe Illustrator
20 x 20”
2021#PopArtists #PopArtLover #PopArts #AcrylicPainter #PopArtGallery #PaintingOnCanvas #PopArtGallery #PaintingADay #PaintersOfIG #PainterArtist #AcrylicPaintingArt #PaintersLife #FineArtGallery #FineArtZone #FineArtwork #FineArtLandscape #FineArtCollector #FineArtPaintings #LandscapePaintings #LandscapePaintingNow #LandscapeArtist #LandscapeArtwork #FineArtLandscape #beaufortsc #sclowcountry #lowcountryliving #beaufortriver #beaufortsouthcarolina
Our kind of #MondayMotivation 😍 #DiscoverSC 📸📍Bluffton Oyster Company: daniymathews
No filter & it was so beautiful I didn't want to make it fit Instagram! #pawleysislandsc #onlypawleys #pawleys #arrogantlyshabby #eastcoast #coastalcarolina #sclowcountry #lowcountry #borntobeach #somebeachsomewhere #peaceloveandsandyfeet #inmymindimgonetocarolina

The South Carolina Lowcountry Guidebook is filled with many things to see and do in the beautiful Lowcountry of South Carolina. Please fill out the information and we will send you a FREE GUIDE BOOK.


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