Return to Congaree Golf Club: THE CJ CUP in South Carolina

After the success of the Palmetto Championship in June 2021, Congaree Golf Club will once again host a PGA TOUR tournament – THE CJ CUP in South Carolina.

The front nine at Congaree Golf Club is pictured on Monday, June 6, 2022 in Ridgeland, South Carolina. (Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Congaree)

THE CJ CUP, which launched in 2017, is Korea’s first Official PGA TOUR tournament.  The first three years of the event were played at Nine Bridges on Jeju Island. Because of the challenges of COVID-19, the tournament was relocated to the United States. The first two locations were Shadow Creek Golf Course (2020) and the Summit Club (2021), both in Las Vegas, NV.

This year will mark the first time THE CJ CUP will be contested in the Southeast at Congaree Golf Club in Ridgeland, SC.

THE CJ CUP will feature a 78-man field. Five players are designated by the Korea Professional Golfers’ Association and three players, of Korean nationality, from the Official World Golf Rankings. This is part of the CJ Group’s vision to support the development of professional golf in Korea. The remainder of the field will be comprised of leading players from the 2021-2022 FedExCup points list and sponsor exemptions.

Holes No. 8 and 9 at Congaree Golf Club are pictured on Monday, June 6, 2022 in Ridgeland, South Carolina. (Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Congaree)

Congaree has received numerous accolades since its opening and was named the Best New Private Golf Course of 2018 and the Best Golf Course Built This Decade (2010-2019) by Golf Digest. The club also debuted at No. 39 on Golf Digest’s ranking of America’s 100 Greatest Golf Courses. Congaree’s 8th Hole, a 488-yard Par 4, has quickly become a favorite of players and was named on Golf.com’s Dream 18 list of the best holes in golf.

The Lodge is pictured from the 18th green at Congaree Golf Club on Saturday, June 4, 2022 in Ridgeland, South Carolina. (Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Congaree)

Congaree is the world’s first philanthropic golf club. Their mission is “to positively impact the lives of young people locally and around the globe by providing educational and vocational opportunities through the game of golf.”

Congaree Foundation’s signature event, the Global Golf Initiative (CGGI) provides underserved and well-deserving high school students, who aspire to play collegiate golf, with the highest level of athletic and academic consulting.

During the one-week program, CGGI participants receive intensive training from educators, guidance counselors and golf instructors, leaving them better prepared for the college admissions process and identifying which schools will be the best for them. While staying at Congaree, students learn about test-taking strategies, goal setting, and resume building as well as NCAA regulations, athletic-academic balance, and how to communicate with coaches. Since its inception in 2017, 138 students from around the world have gone through CGGI, with nearly all of them going on to attend college through a combination of academic and athletic scholarships. Additionally, 48 students have gone on to play college golf at schools like University of Texas, University of Nebraska, College of Charleston, and Elon University.

Hole No. 8 is pictured at Congaree Golf Club on Monday, June 6, 2022 in Ridgeland, South Carolina. (Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Congaree)

Congaree Foundation also works extensively in the Lowcountry to expand access to the game of golf and to address critical needs in the community.

The historic Sergeant Jasper Golf Club in Ridgeland was acquired by the Foundation in 2021. Since then, Congaree Foundation has worked to revitalize The Sarge, as it’s known locally, in order to provide a quality public course for the community and new home to area high school golf teams. In 2018, Congaree launched a youth golf instruction program at Ridgeland-Hardeeville High School that has introduced hundreds of students to the game.

Congaree Foundation also works extensively with the Lowcountry Food Bank and Boys & Girls Club of Jasper County. In 2020, the Congaree Career Launch program was established to connect underserved youth in Jasper County to careers and educational pathways that lead to economic stability and future success. Funded by Congaree Foundation, the program will support access and exposure to workforce opportunities in industries represented in the Lowcountry region.

The back nine at Congaree Golf Club is pictured on Sunday, June 5, 2022 in Ridgeland, South Carolina. (Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Congaree)
2022 Congaree Global Golf Initiative

THE CJ CUP in South Carolina will be contested October 17-23, 2022.

For more information about THE CJ CUP at Congaree Golf Club, volunteer opportunities, and tickets please visit PGATOUR.com.

 

For more information about the South Carolina Lowcountry and planning your visit click here.

Beaufort, SC, approximately 28 miles from Congaree Golf Club.

Bluffton, SC, approximately 28 miles from Congaree Golf Club.

Walterboro, SC, approximately 36 miles from Congaree Golf Club.

 

While in the area stop by the Lowcountry Visitor Center. Our knowledgeable staff will be delighted to share local insight in navigating the area that is south of Charleston and north of Savannah.

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South Carolina Lowcountry: What is it all about?

What is the meaning of Lowcountry? Merriam Webster defines it as “a low-lying country or region especiallythe part of a southern state extending from the seacoast inland to the fall line.” South Carolinians define it as a geographical location and cultural mindset.  But for me… It is more than that!

It’s Beaufort, Colleton, Hampton, and Jasper, the four counties that make up the SC Lowcountry Tourism area. These four counties offer a myriad of unbelievable experiences for all.

On any given day in lowcountry you can:

 

Take a walk under the old oak trees covered in Spanish moss.

oak trees covered in spanish moss
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Feel the sand between your toes as you enjoy our gorgeous beaches.

child playing on beach with bubbles
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Pedal your way around our lush naturescapes.

bike through sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Soak up some history at one of our many museums, former plantations, or historical churches and structures.

historical churches of sc lowcountry
(Photography: Keelie Robinson)

 

Become one with nature as you spy an alligator, deer, or Great Blue Heron paddling down a lazy Lowcountry river.

kayaker on lowcountry river
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Stroll along our beaches as you scavenge for shark teeth.

shark teeth found in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Immerse yourself in the hunt for the next big fish.

fisherman in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Step off the beaten path to find our numerous hidden gems.

sunset in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Window shop our local boutiques and stores.

shopping in boutiques of sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Spy an array of birds in our Wildlife Refuges and Wildlife Management Areas

bird watchers in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

Meander along our waterfront parks.

water front park in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Savor a bounty of renowned local cuisine fresh from the sea and our nearby farms.

fresh local food in sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Unwind and relax as you revel in a lowcountry sunset.

couple relaxing sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

 

Welcome our lowcountry culture into your heart and mind as you are transported back in time.

culture of sc lowcountry
(Photography: Lowcountry Tourism Commission)

Come along and we’ll explore this region, south of Charleston and north of Savannah, to find what makes the SC Lowcountry NATURALLY AMAZING!

 

 

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The Mighty Southern Live Oak Tree

The live oak in the front yard of Frampton Plantation is estimated to be around 300 years old. Photo by Lowcountry Tourism Commission.

When you think of the south, you conjure images of the mighty live oak trees dripping in Spanish moss. These magnificent trees stand sentry around homes and lead the way down country lanes. The specimens that surround Frampton Plantation House have been around for 300 years. In fact, it was noted that after the original house was burned during the Civil War, the home was rebuilt in a different spot between four live oaks. All four trees are still alive and thriving today. In fact, these very trees have been reaching for the sun since c.1743.

Picnic under the southern live oaks in the backyard of Frampton Plantation Visitors Center. We’re conveniently located off I-95, at Exit 33 in Yemassee. Photo by Carmen Pinckney.

Live Oak trees are always up for company. Along the southern coast, live oaks live life beside Spanish moss and resurrection fern. Neither plant causes harm, they both feed from humidity and air. Resurrection fern grows along the tops of branches, turning green during rain and humidity, then brown when the air is dry. Spanish moss drapes gracefully from branches, feeding from water and nutrients found in the air.

Live oak branches tend to grow horizontally, dipping down then reaching back up toward the sun. This Tomotley Plantation tree is no exception. Photo by CJ Brown.

The branches of southern live oaks tend to grow horizontally, spreading across the landscape. Being a product of the south, I can attest to the fact that they make great climbing trees. If you were lucky enough to grow up with a live oak in your yard, there were always hordes of kids who wanted to climb, swing or picnic in the shade of these magnificent trees.  

Spanish moss and live oaks make a perfect backdrop for a Lowcountry wedding. Cotton Hall Plantation is available for just such an occasion. Photo by Cotton Hall.

Live oaks can grow to a height of 80 feet high. Given the room to grow, they can spread 100 feet wide. They grow at a rate of 13 – 24 inches per year. They grow in sun and shade and will thrive in just about any kind of soil. They can be found along the beach, deep in the forest, and everywhere in between. Mature live oaks can have a diameter of 6 feet. Some of the oldest live oaks are estimated to be several hundred to more than a thousand years old.

This 300 year old live oak stands watch in front of the Frampton Plantation house. Photo by Lowcountry Tourism Commission.

Southern live oak trees are nearly evergreen. They replace their leaves sporadically, so we never notice their shedding process. They produce sweet acorns that are a favorite food source of both birds and mammals. Wild turkey and deer are especially fond of this delicacy.

While live oaks can be found from Virginia to Florida and as far west as Texas and Oklahoma, the Southern live oak grows best in salty soils along the coast. Like most southerners, this tree is particularly fond of warm temperatures and salty breezes.

This lovely home on Hampton Street in Walterboro has a yard complete with a live oak. Photo by Lowcountry Tourism Commission.

The wood from southern live oaks is very dense and strong. It was once a preferred wood for shipbuilding. The naval vessel USS Constitution was made from the wood of live oaks. Repeated cannon fire could not destroy the ship during the War of 1812. The British cannons literally bounced off the live oak hull of the ship. The ship was nicknamed “Old Ironsides” after it survived the attack. Many older homes are floored with wood from these magnificent trees. Oak flooring is durable and takes on a golden hue with age and wear.  Structural beams and posts were also made from the strong wood of live oaks.

Live oak alleys can be seen throughout the Lowcountry. Some of the most popular can be found on Edisto Island and Lady’s Island, Beaufort. Many older plantation properties are distinguished by their alley of live oaks. Planted on both sides of lanes, the branches reach across and form a canopy across the roadways. Old Sheldon Road is a wonderful example of a live oak canopy. Nestled between Yemassee and Beaufort, this road leads to the Old Sheldon Church Ruins.

Old Sheldon road connects with Cotton Hall Road. This canopied road is home to several plantation entrances with live oak alleys. Both Tomotley and Cotton Hall Plantation entrances are visible. Yemassee’s McPhersonville Road is another great place to view a canopy.

Iconic oak alleys can be found on the route to Edisto Beach. ACE Basin and Botany Bay Plantation Wildlife Management Areas both have canopied entrances. They can be accessed via Highway 174.

Most of Bluffton’s Hwy 46 is covered in a live oak canopy. Pinckney Colony is lined with aged oaks as well.

The Beaufort Sea Islands are also great places to spend the day driving under the oaks. Coffin Point, Meridian and Lands End Road are good examples.

Savannah National Wildlife Refuge and Hwy 17 just south of Ridgeland are good spots in Jasper County to view the trees. Colleton County’s Donnelley Wildlife Management Area is another great place to drive through and see live oaks. Hampton County’s Webb Wildlife Management Area also has many examples of southern live oaks.

Resurrection fern is best seen after a good rain. This live oak can be found in the backyard of Frampton Plantation Visitors Center in Yemassee. Photo by Carmen Pinckney.
Resurrection fern and Spanish moss intermingle along the branches of this southern live oak tree that can be found in the front yard of Frampton Plantation Visitors Center. Photo by Carmen Pinckney.
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SC Lowcountry…

nestled between Charleston and Savannah, this natural paradise awaits your visit!

Just south of Charleston and north of Savannah, a natural paradise awaits your visit! The historic Kings Highway 17 travels through the beautiful SC Lowcountry and these protected treasures. The area that lies between Charleston and Savannah is a nature lover’s paradise. Here you will find wildlife management areas, nature trails, church ruins and a welcome center located in a historic house.

Start your journey at the Frampton Plantation & Lowcountry Visitors Center. We have all the information you need and a kind staff to deliver all the secrets to enjoying the SC Lowcountry. Our historic property used to be a part of a 4,000 acre cotton plantation. The original home was burned during the Civil War, but the current structure was rebuilt in 1868. Only four acres remains of the property today, but we are using them wisely. The backyard is the perfect spot for a picnic and take the dogs on a walk throughout the woods. We will also give directions to the Old Sheldon Church Ruins, which are just up the street. 1 Low Country Lane, Yemassee, SC, I-95, Exit 33.

Old Sheldon church Ruins photo by Carmen Pinckney.

The Old Sheldon church Ruins were burned during the Revolutionary War, rebuilt, then demolished during the Civil War. This site is a must-see for anyone traveling from Charleston to Savannah. It’s only a two-mile detour off the route. While travelling down Highway 17, Old Sheldon Church Road is just past the turn to Beaufort.

Explore the trails at Walterboro Wildlife Sanctuary. Photo found on Walterboro website.
  1. Walterboro Wildlife Sanctuary

There is a beautiful wildlife sanctuary located in the middle of the historic and picturesque city of Walterboro, SC. Easily reached from I-95, the Walterboro Wildlife Sanctuary is a great place to leave the traffic behind, stretch your legs and enjoy nature. The sanctuary contains a network of boardwalks, hiking, biking and canoe trails that are perfect for viewing a diversity of a black water bottomland habitat.

Detreville Rd (Off Hwy 17A)
Walterboro, SC
843-782-6081

The antebellum Oak Grove Plantation House still stands. Photo by Carmen Pinckney.

2. ACE Basin National Wildlife Refuge

The Ernest F. Hollings ACE Basin National Wildlife Refuge is home to a vast array of waterfowl, fish, shellfish and many other animals. It is also the home of Oak Grove Plantation House. A walk behind the house leads visitors to the former rice fields. Rows, dikes, trunks, and gates are still visible today. The paths are marked and meander around the rice fields and through wooded areas. Make sure to bring your camera and be on the lookout for wildlife.

8675 Willtown Rd
Hollywood, SC  29449
843-889-3084

Hike the trails or stroll the beach at Edisto Beach State Park. Photo by Dale Gingerich.

3. Edisto Beach State Park

The Edisto Beach State Park has 4 miles of ADA accessible trails for hiking and biking. These trails take you through maritime forest, historic monuments, and a Native American shell mound. These trails are also great for bird watching. Many shore and wading birds can be seen here.

8377 State Cabin Rd
Edisto Island, SC
843-869-2156

Step back in time at Donnelley Wildlife Management Areas. Photo by Carmen Pinckney.

4. Donnelley Wildlife Management Area

Donnelley is a favorite spot for tourists and locals alike. It is located on Hwy 17 in Green Pond (between Yemassee and Jacksonboro) in the heart of the ACE Basin. Open from dawn to dusk, this is a great place to glimpse Lowcountry nature at its finest. The property features a historic rice field system, which is now managed to attract waterfowl and migratory birds. The drive is pleasantly lined with beautiful old live oaks.

585 Donnelley Dr.
Green Pond, SC

Hike the trails, fish or just relax at Lake Warren State Park. Photo by SC Lowcountry Tourism Commission.

5. Lake Warren State Park

Lake Warren State Park is located just outside Hampton. The park provides many opportunities for outdoor recreation. A wide variety of wildlife can be found in the floodplain forest, wetlands and woodlands of the park. While walking in the park look for deer, armadillo, turtles, raccoons, squirrels… Be on the lookout for alligators, snakes and birds along the shores of the lake.

1079 Lake Warren Road
Hampton, SC
803-943-5051

The Spanish Moss Trail is the perfect spot to hike or bike through Beaufort. Photo by Carmen Pinckney.

6. Spanish Moss Trail

The Spanish Moss Trail is an expanding rails-to-trail greenway running from northern Beaufort County to Port Royal along the historic Magnolia Line Railroad. This 10-mile greenway has become a must-experience activity for locals and tourists alike. The 12-foot-wide paved trail is a great space for walking, running, biking, skating, scooting, strolling or even fishing. The trail is handicap accessible, and parking is provided.

Beaufort County
Access points can be found HERE

Hunting Island State Park must be experienced to be believed. Photo by SC Lowcountry Tourism Commission.

7. Hunting Island State Park

Hunting Island State Park is the most popular park in the state. Over one million visitors visit each year. The Lowcountry barrier island contains five miles of beautiful beaches, a saltwater lagoon along with 5,000 acres of maritime forest and marsh. Hunting Island is also home to the state’s only publicly accessible lighthouse. Visitors are encouraged to climb the 167 steps to the top and observe the breath-taking views of the maritime forest and beach from 130 feet above.

2555 Sea Island Pkwy
Hunting Island, SC
843-838-2011

The Blue Heron Nature Trail circles a lake and ventures into forested wetlands. Photo by Lyn Boyles.

8. Blue Heron Nature Trail

This in-town green space boasts a nature trail that travels around a three-acre pond and through forested wetlands filled with ferns and native plants. The property also includes a butterfly garden, picnic area, outdoor classroom, observation decks, and a Nature Center. Permanent trailside displays help visitors learn more about the native flora and fauna of Jasper County and the Lowcountry.

321 Bailey Lane
Ridgeland, SC
843-726-7611

Hike the trails or rent kayaks or canoes at Sgt. Jasper Park. Photo by SC Lowcountry Tourism Commission.

9. Sgt. Jasper Park

Sgt. Jasper Park is conveniently located off I-95, at Exit 8. After exiting the interstate, point toward Hilton Head and turn left at the first traffic light. Follow the road around until you bump into the park entrance. Trails are located on both sides of the road. Some trails are wheelchair accessible. This is a great place to get off the interstate and stretch your legs. Dogs are welcome here, on a leash. A trail map is available in the park office.

458 Red Dam Rd.
Hardeeville, SC
843-784-5130

The former rice fields of Savannah National Wildlife Refuge are filled with local wildlife. Photo by Becky Mathews.

10. Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

The Savannah National Wildlife Refuge offers a variety of opportunities to explore and enjoy the great outdoors from sunrise to sunset every day. You can observe and photograph wildlife, fish, or during the season, hunt white-tailed deer. Make the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center your first stop when visiting the refuge. Located on Hwy 17 between Hardeeville and Savannah, it is open Monday – Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., but closed Sundays and all federal holidays.

694 Beech Hill Ln
Hardeeville, SC
843-784-2468

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WWII African American Exhibit

The community is invited to the opening celebration of  the traveling exhibit “A War on Two Fronts: African Americans Fight for Victory at Home and  Abroad” on February 5, 2022, from 11 am to 1 pm at the Morris Center for Lowcountry  Heritage. 

Dr. Maggi Morehouse from Coastal Carolina University will be on hand to discuss the origins of  the project which explores the stories, struggles and accomplishments of African soldiers during  World War II. Attendees can view footage of interviews from Orease Brown and Henry Lawton,  two of the black WWII veterans from Jasper County. The event will also include guided tours of  the exhibition, light refreshments and music from the 1940s era. 

More than one million African Americans served during WWII, but their contributions to the  war effort are rarely discussed. “A War on Two Fronts” is adapted from an original exhibition  and book developed by the Athenaeum Press at the Horry County Museum. The exhibition and  book explore how African Americans in the 92nd and 93rd Army infantry divisions fought for  racial equality during wartime, and then went on to be active participants in the Civil Rights  Movement. It traces the little-known stories of soldiers on the front lines, and how segregation  affected their training, service and recognition.  

The exhibition draws from the work of Dr. Maggi Morehouse, Burroughs Distinguished  Professor of Southern History and Culture at Coastal Carolina University and a daughter of a  commanding officer in the 92nd infantry division. Morehouse interviewed more than 40 soldiers  and their families on their experiences. Her archive will be housed at the Library of Congress.  The exhibit includes historical photographs, interviews with soldiers, film, audio and  interactives, to tell the compelling story of the life of a black soldier during WWII.  

“We are very pleased to be able to bring ‘A War on Two Fronts’ to our area,” said Tamara  Herring, Morris Center Executive Director. “It allows us the opportunity to showcase the  contributions and sacrifices of our local veterans, and we hope that it will inspire many to study  and talk about this important time of our nation’s history.”  

On view at the Morris Center from February 5, 2022, through August 13, 2022, “A War on Two  Fronts” was created by the Athenaeum Press, a student publishing lab at Coastal Carolina  University that focuses on telling regional stories in innovative ways. To learn more about “A War on Two Fronts” and other Athenaeum Press projects, visit www.ccu.press or  www.warontwofronts.com.  

The Morris Center is open to the public Tuesday – Saturday from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. For  more information, please visit www.morrisheritagecenter.org

About Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage 

Located in the heart of downtown Ridgeland on US 17, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage  is a learning and exhibition center dedicated to preserving and cultivating the history, culture  and spirit of Ridgeland and its surrounding counties. Housed in a collection of vintage buildings,  with the architecturally distinctive Sinclair Service Station as its focal point, the center features  ever-changing exhibitions, interactive and dynamic learning opportunities, cultural offerings,  storytelling and other forms of art

For more information on other attractions and dining in Ridgeland visit southcarolinalowcountry.com.

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Daufuskie Blues

The tradition of indigo dyeing lives on.

The history of indigo production in South Carolina goes all the way back to the birth of our nation and a very special lady named Eliza Lucas Pinckney. The wife of a prominent statesman, Pinckney oversaw the first successful cultivation of South Carolina indigo in 1744. By 1748, indigo was second only to rice as the colony’s commodity cash crop.

Daufuskie Island residents Leanne Coulter and Rhonda Davis run Daufuskie Blues, an indigo dying company that honors this South Carolina tradition. They create eye-catching designs and patterns on scarves, cloth, and other fabrics. The ladies of Daufuskie Blues like to take their show on the road and teach indigo dying workshops around the Lowcountry.

Prior to the late 1880s, the only way to obtain blue dye was with the indigo plant. Leanne and Rhonda take great pride in sharing the history and methodology behind the indigo dying process. Ridgeland’s Morris Center is one of the sites for these classes. The Blues ladies first discussed the history of indigo growing wild on Daufuskie. They also grow it for production. The plant’s leaves are broken down in a reduction vat to make it water soluble. Once the dye is prepared, folded, stitched, twisted or cinched fabric is placed inside the vat. The dye first turns the fabric green. Exposure to the air creates a rich blue hue.   

After the final soak and rinse the fun really started. Fabric was released from its bindings and all the beautiful patterns were revealed. Each piece was a unique work of art.

Indigo dying classes can be found at Hilton Head’s Coastal Discovery Museum, Walterboro’s Colleton Museum and Ridgeland’s Morris Center. You can also head over to Daufuskie Island and visit with Leanne and Rhonda at their store. Workshops can also be scheduled by appointment on Daufuskie Island.

Daufuskie Blues is currently located in the historic Mary Field School, built in 1933, where Pat Conroy once taught. The island and his experiences teaching there inspired him to write his first book The Water is Wide, which was made into the motion picture Conrak. Daufuskie Island is only accessible by boat or ferry. It is one mile south of Hilton Head. Daufuskie Blues is open Tuesdays – Saturdays, from 11 am – 4 pm.

Daufuskie Blues
203 Schoolhouse Road
(843) 707-2664, (843)368-3717
leanne.daufuskieblues@gmail.com

For more information about Daufuskie Island history and attractions, visit southcarolinalowcountry.com/daufuskie-island.

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Lt Colonel John Laurens

The American Revolutionary War Hero that met his end along the Combahee River.

Lt Colonel John Laurens

John Laurens was an American soldier and statesman. Born on October 28, 1754, Laurens was the son of Henry Laurens, a plantation owner from Charleston. After studying law in England, Laurens returned to America to join George Washington’s staff during the Revolutionary War in August of 1777. He joined an elite group of aides and secretaries that surrounded the commander in chief. He was very close friends with Alexander Hamilton and the Marquis de Lafayette. Laurens was present in all George Washington’s battles, from Brandywine to Yorktown.

Laurens was quickly known for his thoughts criticizing slavery. As the son of a wealthy slave owner from Charleston, Laurens grew up around slavery and developed very strong feelings against the practice. During the American Revolution, Laurens left Washington’s staff to return to the south and push for legislature to recruit a regiment of black soldiers that would earn their freedom by fighting in the war.

Laurens was a very brave and courageous soldier. He was wounded during the Battle of Germantown (Philadelphia 1777) and again at Coosawhatchie (SC Lowcountry 1779). When General Charles Lee spoke against George Washington’s character in 1778, Laurens wounded him in a duel. Alexander Hamilton acted as his second and ended the duel before a second shot could be fired.

Laurens went on to distinguish himself in Savannah and at the siege of Charleston. Charleston, Laurens was captured by the British during the British victory at Charleston in 1780. He was exchanged and returned to Washington’s staff.  Then he was sent to France as a special envoy to appeal to their king for supplies and support. This successful mission led to Cornwallis’s defeat at Yorktown on October 19, 1781. Laurens was designated to aid in the terms of his surrender.

After Yorktown, Laurens travelled back to South Carolina. During a skirmish on the Combahee River, Laurens was killed while leading 50 men and one cannon to reinforce a position in the British rear to cut off their retreat. The British caught wind of Laurens’ movements and ambushed his troops along the route. Laurens was fatally wounded on August 27, 1782. He was only 29 years old.

George Washington was very saddened by the death of one of his most trustworthy aids. In a eulogy to the young soldier, he said, “The Death of Colo Laurens I consider as a very heavy misfortune, not only as it affects the public at large; but particularly to his Family, and all his private Friends and Connections, to whom his amiable and useful Character had rendered him peculiarly dear.” Laurens’ comrade Alexander Hamilton sent a letter to the Marquis de Lafayette: “Poor Laurens; he has fallen a sacrifice to his ardor in a trifling skirmish in South Carolina. You know how truly I loved him and will judge how much I regret him.”

Major General Nathaniel Greene wrote, “Poor Laurens has fallen in a paltry little skirmish. You knew his temper, and I predicted his fate. The love of military glory made him seek it upon occasions unworthy his rank. The state will feel his loss.”

Henry Laurens was buried at Mepkin Abbey, in Moncks Corner, South Carolina.

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Let’s Get Pickin’ – Local produce can be found across the Lowcountry

Farm Fresh Produce in the SC Lowcountry

 

Farm fresh local produce can be found during the spring and summer months throughout the SC Lowcountry. From u-pick farms, to produce stands and farmers markets, seasonal produce is abundant in our neck of the woods!

 

 

U-Pick

Beaufort County

You can find Dempsey Farms on the way to Hunting Island State Park, Harbor and Fripp Islands. The farm has various produce throughout the seasons, starting with strawberries in April.  They are a working family farm growing produce for the last sixty years. For a farm fresh experience stop by and pick with us. Follow their Facebook page to see what is available.

1576 Sea Island Pkwy.
St Helena Island, SC 29920
843-838-3656

Bluffton’s Okatee River Farms has a great selection of local fruit and produce. This small family farm is located 1/2 mile from 278 in Bluffton, SC. They grow tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, okra, peppers and strawberries. April and May is the perfect time to stop by for u-pick strawberries. Follow their Facebook page to see what’s available.

1921 Okatie Hwy.
Okatie SC
843-206-5023

Colleton County

 Breland Hill Farm is a multigenerational family farm raising fruits, vegetables, and much more! A market is located in Ruffin. Housed in a repurposed tobacco barn, they grow, process, and sell all of their farm products here. U-pick strawberry fields are also located here. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s in season.

849 Spence Dr.
Ruffin, SC 29475
843-866-7560 Call for hours of operation.

 

 

Shop at the Farm

 

Beaufort County

Morning Glory Homestead is a family farm on St. Helena Island, which uses sustainable agriculture methods to feed the community. This small family farm began as a homestead for a family of seven. Visitors to the farm can buy seasonal produce, bakery items, eggs and honey. You can also call to schedule a farm tour. The tour includes the rich history of the Gullah community.

For more information visit their blog.

Mon – Fri:  By Appointment
42 Robert & Clara Trail
St. Helena Island, SC
843-812-0344

Bluffton’s Okatee River Farms has a great selection of local fruit and produce. They currently have u-pick strawberries. They are also currently planting sunflowers for harvest. They also have seasonal fruit and veggies throughout the year. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s in season.

1921 Okatie Hwy.
Okatie SC
843-206-5023

Colleton

Kindlewood Farms was born from the interest in the age old techniques of grafting and a passion to create quality, sustainable produce. We are dedicated to producing high quality heirloom tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, okra, corn, squash, cucumbers, watermelon, and cantaloupe. We also grow grafted heirloom tomato plants and grafted cucurbits. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s in season and where to find them.

kindlewood.farms@gmail.com
(843)302-2312

Jasper County

If you are in Jasper County and looking for fresh eggs, look no farther than Earleah Plantation. Call for more information or to order and pick up fresh eggs.
843-540-2200,  earleahvintageglass@gmail.com

Whipporwhill Farms is a40-acre small family farm offering fresh chicken, rabbit and pork as well as fresh eggs and seasonal veggies. Come to the farm Monday, Wednesday or Sunday to shop on site, or find them at the Hilton Head Farmers Market at Coastal Discovery Museum on Tuesdays. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s in stock.

870 Tillman Road
Ridgeland, SC
843-473-5231

Hampton County

Murdaugh Farms is a family-owned and operated farm offering a large variety of produce throughout the year. Some of the produce offered include the well-known Hampton County watermelons, squash (several varieties), cucumbers, zucchini, corn, red potatoes and other varieties of potatoes, okra, carrots, collard greens and many other types of produce. As produce becomes available, it will be posted on the Facebook page. We sell our produce both to the wholesale and retail markets as well as to individual buyers looking for just enough for a meal or two.

22603 Pocotaligo Road
Early Branch, SC
803-942-3814

Drawdy Farms is a family-owned business, selling fresh locally grown fruits and veggies. Their produce stand is open year around, with whatever is in season at the time. We proudly serve the low country and support local farmers. Join their Facebook page for weekly updates!

2598 Hopewell Rd
Brunson, SC

 

The Port Royal Farmer’s Market is open Saturdays, from 9 am-noon, rain or shine. You will find fresh, local, seasonal produce, shrimp, oysters, poultry, beef, pork, eggs, bread and cheese. If you have a green thumb, look for plants, ferns, camellias, azaleas, citrus trees and beautiful, fresh cut flower bouquets. Check out the fabulous prepared food vendors serving BBQ, dumplings, she crab soup, crab cakes, paella, coffee, baked goods, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Find them at the Port Royal Naval Heritage Park at the intersection of Ribaut Road and Pinckney Blvd.

The Bluffton Farmers Market is open Thursdays, from 12-5 pm. Come find fresh, locally grown vegetables, fruits, flowers, plants and herbs at the Farmers Market of Bluffton. Gather with locals and tourists at this weekly community event to buy excellent produce, enjoy delicious food, listen to entertainment, and relax with friends. Located in historic downtown Bluffton along Calhoun and Lawrence Streets and through Carson Cottages, this family friendly market showcases local growers, local food vendors, local entertainment, local community causes and local information about the Bluffton area. Find them at 71 Green Street in historic Bluffton.

Come to the Hilton Head Island Farmers Market at Coastal Discovery Museum and take home fresh produce, chicken, rabbit, pork, seafood, salsa, fresh sausage, beef, meals to cook, cookies, breads, she crab soup and much more! The market is open every Tuesday from 10-3 in the spring, summer and fall. Hours shorten to 9 am-1 pm in the winter. Shopping at the Hilton Head Farmers Market is about more than getting great food, it is about meeting friends, strengthening the community, and rebuilding the local food economy. Find the Hilton Head Farmers Market on the grounds of Coastal Discovery Museum, 70 Honey Horn Drive, on Hilton Head Island.

The Ridgeland Farmers Market hosts a variety of vendors, including produce, baked goods, prepared meals, arts, crafts and estate sales. The market is located on Main Street in downtown Ridgeland. They are open Fridays, from 1-6 pm.

Hampton Farmers Market – 803-943-2586 Highway 278, Hampton

 

 

Roadside Markets

Beaufort County

Barefoot Farms – 939 Sea Island Parkway St. Helena, SC, (843) 838-7421

Dempsey Farms – 1576 Sea Island Parkway, St. Helena, SC, (843) 838-3656

Four Seasons Produce and Nursery – 1611 Trask Pkwy, Seabrook, SC, (843) 846-2777

Lowcountry Produce – 1919 Trask Pkwy, Seabrook, SC, (843) 846-9438

Pasture Shed Farm – 1083 Sea Island Parkway St. Helena Island, SC, (843) 812-8366

Colleton County

Keegan-Filion Farm – 1475 Keegan Drive, Walterboro, SC, (843) 538-2565

Rizer’s Pork and Produce – 2357 Confederate Hwy., Lodge, SC, (843) 866-2645

Breland Hill Farm 1002 Bells Hwy, Walterboro, SC, (843)5497560

Jasper

Whippoorwhill Farms – 870 Tillman Road, Ridgeland, SC, (843)473-5231

Hampton

Drawdy Farms 2598 Hopewell Rd, Brunson

 

 

Community Supported Agriculture

Beaufort County (Bluffton) – Three Sisters Farm

Colleton – Kindlewood Farms

 

 

Fresh Meat & Seafood

Beaufort

Sea Eagle Market is a family owned and operated retail and wholesale market and catering company located at 2149 Boundary St. in Beaufort. Stop by and pick up soft shell crabs, shrimp and more! Open Monday thru Saturday, from 9 am – 6 pm. For daily information visit their Facebook page. (843)521-5090

Maggioni Oyster Company is South Carolina’s largest provider of premium quality wild-harvested bushels and single oysters. They harvest oysters at low tide, wash off the briny mud, and deliver them directly to their customers. Maggioni Oyster Company first opened on Daufuskie Island in 1883 and later built a cannery in Beaufort. They have been family owned and operated for five generations. Find them at 440 Eddings Point Rd, on St. Helena Island. (912)844-1031

Lady’s Island Oysters specializes in single lady oysters, grown in the clean, crisp waters of the SC Lowcountry. The estuaries that nurture their oysters are filled with pure salt water flowing directly from the Atlantic Ocean. Great pride is taken to nurture oysters from hatchery to harvest. Find them at 35 Hutson Drive, in Seabrook. (843)473-5018

Bluffton

Bluffton Oyster Company has been a family run operation since 1899. The Bluffton Oyster Company actually sits on reclaimed land, built up by more than a hundred years of discarded shells from previous shucking operations. The oyster business thrived in early Bluffton and throughout the 1920’s, with five different oyster operations in the area. Now the Bluffton Oyster Company remains the last hand-shucking house in the state of South Carolina. They specialize in fresh local seafood; oysters, clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, fish filets, soft shell crabs and live blue crabs. Hours of operation are 9 am – 5:30 pm, Monday thru Saturday. You can also purchase fried shrimp, oysters and soft shell crab at the Bluffton Farmers Market on Thursdays. Find them at 63 Wharf St. (843)757-4010

Edisto Island

Flowers Seafood has been commercially fishing and serving fresh, local seafood on Edisto Island for four generations. Come into their family owned seafood market and browse the selection of fresh, wild caught seafood. They have a large selection of fish, shrimp, crabs, and other seafood that comes “fresh  off the boat” daily. If you’re interested in cooked food try their “To-Go”  restaurant located right behind Flowers Seafood Company.  The same fresh seafood is made ready to order. Stop by on your way to Edisto Beach. The market is open Monday-Saturday, from 9 am-6 pm, and Sunday 9 am-5 pm. The Flowers Seafood To-Go Food Truck is open Thursday-Saturday 11 am-7 pm. They are located just six miles from the beach at 1914 Hwy 174, Edisto Island, SC (843)869-0033 (Market), (843)869-3303 (kitchen/to-go orders)

Ridgeland

Fiddler’s Seafood Market and Restaurant is a historical and beloved destination where fresh seafood is enjoyed and homemade goods are shared. Fiddlers gives customers an authentic taste of local, old-fashioned southern comfort. Their seafood is either caught by Fiddler’s owner, Billy Rowell on his very own boat or purchased from local fishermen. Within walking distance of their restaurant is the seafood market, where customers can bring home southern hospitality in its finest form. Fresh produce, homemade baked goods, and local crafts are all created by our own staff, or by the artisans of the Ridgeland, SC community. Visit their Facebook page to see what’s going on in the restaurant and market, or visit for yours self. The restaurant is located at 7738 West Main Street, (843)726-6681. The seafood market is just around the corner at 572 South Green Street, (843)726-6691.

Hampton

Tuten’s Fresh Market Meat and Seafood is Hampton’s finest local butcher shop. This family owned business has been around for over 30 years. Ran by an expert butcher and grill master, Tuten’s is dedicated to delivering the very best meat and freshest seafood, with farm fresh produce and some staple grocery items as well! Come by and see them sometime. They’ll be glad to help you find anything you are looking for as well as give you some great tips for seasoning, marinating, and grilling your meals to perfection. Located at 604 Elm St. in Hampton, (803)943-4670. Visit their Facebook page for daily updates.

 

 

 

 

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The PGA Palmetto Championship

The Congaree Golf Club is the home of this 2021 PGA Tour event!

 

PGA Palmetto Championship

The Palmetto Championship, a PGA Tour event, will be held June 7-13 in Ridgeland at the Congaree Golf Club. This one-time event will fill the spot left open when the 2021 RBC Canadian Open was cancelled. This official FedEx Cup event will field 156 golfers.

 

Governor Henry McMaster recently announced the event and said, “South Carolina is open for business and we are proud to have the opportunity to take advantage of this unique opportunity. This nationally televised, elite tournament will give people from around the world a chance to see all that South Carolina has to offer and will jumpstart our tremendous tourism industry. We are grateful to the PGA Tour and Congaree’s owner, Dan Friedkin, for this opportunity to highlight our great state.”

 

 

The Congaree Golf Club was built on Davant Plantation. The original Greek Revival home on this historic property was burned in 1865 by Sherman’s troops. The circa 1820 that we see today was dismantled and transferred piece-by-piece to this site from a neighboring property that was also owned by the Davant family. This property was also the principal backdrop for scenes in the 1995 movie Something to Talk About. The club launched the Global Golf Initiative to target underprivileged high school students who are passionate about golf and show academic promise. They even built a schoolhouse on the property to prepare students for college admissions. Congaree’s Palmetto Championship joins the list of other 2021 significant tournaments in the state including the RBC Heritage in Hilton Head Island, the PGA Championship on Kiawah Island and Greenville’s annual BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation.

 

The 2021 Palmetto Championship at Congaree will be broadcast on CBS, Golf Channel and PGA TOUR LIVE, and internationally on GOLFTV powered by the PGA TOUR.

Please visit https://www.pgatour.com/tournaments/palmetto-championship-at-congaree.html for details about tickets, sponsorships, volunteering and more.

 

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New Civil War Exhibit

Morris Center Expands Battle of Honey Hill Exhibition

The Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage is pleased to announce the reopening of its Battle of Honey Hill exhibition. This event is significant because the battle, fought near Ridgeland, S.C., was the first one of the Civil War to involve a large number of African Americans in combat.

 With the existing diorama as the focal point, the exhibit includes new panels that tell a more detailed story of how the battle unfolded, newly unearthed artifacts from the site including tools and ammunition, a tribute to four Medal of Honor recipients, and a section entitled “Voices of Honey Hill” which shares first-hand accounts from some of the soldiers involved.

“Generous support from our sponsors made it possible to expand the exhibit which has been on display here since we opened in 2015,” says Morris Center Executive Director Tamara Herring. “We enlisted the help of Civil War scholars and strived to give it more historical context as well as explain the battle’s significance in terms of the intersection of people who were engaged in it.”

South Carolina Humanities, Town of Ridgeland, and Jasper County provided funds to support the project.

The Morris Center is open to the public Tuesday – Friday from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. For more information, please visit www.morrisheritagecenter.org.

The Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage is located in the heart of downtown Ridgeland on US 17. This facility is a learning and exhibition center dedicated to preserving and cultivating the history, culture and spirit of Ridgeland and its surrounding counties. Housed in a collection of vintage buildings, with the architecturally distinctive Sinclair Service Station as its focal point, the center features ever-changing exhibitions, interactive and dynamic learning opportunities, cultural offerings, storytelling, and other forms of art.

Read our BLOG POST for more information on the Morris Center or visit our RIDGELAND ATTRACTIONS PAGE.

10782 Jacob Smart Blvd.
Ridgeland, SC 29936
843-284-9227

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See what our visitors love about the
SOUTH CAROLINA LOWCOUNTRY

Use the #hashtag #sclowcountry to get your image featured!

The Lowcountry & Resort Islands Region of South Carolina includes the four, southern-most counties in the state, Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton, and Colleton, which are bordered on the east by the Atlantic Ocean and on the west by the Savannah River and the state of Georgia.

simplysoutherncottage keeps us in awe with each her projects. This bed swing refresh is one of our favorites!
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📸: simplysoutherncottage⠀
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Beautiful South Carolina Lowcountry
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#southcarolina #southcarolinacoast #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #lifeonthecoast #coastliving #coastalsouthcarolina #saltyair #saltlife #wildlife #wildlifephotography #spanishmoss #sunrisesunset
The shore gently recedes beneath the stunning Pawleys Island Pier. The unique island town, located about 25 miles south of Myrtle Beach and 70 miles north of Charleston, exudes laid-back, beachy vibes. Locals have definitely adopted an island state of mind and encourage visitors to as well. When you go, make sure to relax on the beach, explore the famous sand dunes, or fish in one of the many adjacent creeks.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: We guarantee that you’re going to want to spend a whole day here. We recommend getting to the beach at around 10am.🗓️ Best time of the year: Pawleys Island has the best weather during the spring and early summer months.🏖️ Things to do while there: Pawleys Island Nature Park, Pawleys Island Chapel, Hopsewee Plantation.🐠 Things to visit in the area: Brookgreen Gardens (brookgreen_gardens), take a walking ghost tour, Myrtle Beach (mymyrtlebeach), Harborwalk Marina, South Carolina Maritime Museum (southcarolinamaritimemuseum).🏨 Where to stay: The Oceanfront Litchfield Inn (oceanfrontlitchfieldinn), Litchfield Beach and Golf Resort (litchfieldbeachandgolf), Sea View Inn (seaviewinn), 620 Prince (620prince).Photo by qcphotographer
#southcarolinaliving #southcarolina #edistobeach #edistosc #southcarolinanature #bestofthepalmettostate #onlyinsouthcarolina #treesofinstagram #treeporn #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #southcarolinabeaches #charleston #charlestonsc #ig_naturelovers #ig_southcarolina #viewsofthesouth #charlestonlife
South Carolina Lowcountry
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📸sarah_snydacker
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#southcarolina #southcarolinacoast #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #lifeonthecoast #coastliving #coastalsouthcarolina #saltyair #saltlife #wildlife #wildlifephotography #sunrisesunset #charleston
Headed down the road....Edisto Island.  #edisto #sclowcountry #trees #endofday  #beauty #islandsofsc
Spanish moss drapes the live oak trees that are ubiquitous to the Edisto Island area. Did you know that Edisto gets its name from the native Edistow people? The Edistow Native Americans were a sub tribe of the Cusabo indians, a group of Native Americans who lived along the Atlantic coast in South Carolina.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: Stop by mid-morning. That way you can explore the island, grab lunch, and stay for the amazing sunset if you choose.🏖️ Things to do while there: Edisto Environmental Learning Center, Boneyard Beach, Scott Creek Inlet, Big Bay Creek, SeaCow Eatery.☀️ Things to visit in the area: Jungle Road Park, Bay Creek Park, Otter Islands, Spanish Mount Point.📆 Best time of the year to visit: For warmer weather come anywhere from March-August.🏨 Where to stay: Fripp Island Golf & Beach Resort (frippislandrsrt), Seabrook Island Club (seabrook_sc), The Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort (kiawahresort), Charleston Kiawah Island/Andell Inn (andellinn).Photo by qcphotographer
Discover at your own leisure at the coastaldiscoverymuseum 🌳  From century-old buildings with storied pasts, to wooden boardwalks that stretch into the Jarvis Creek salt marsh, there's always something to explore!
A visitor takes a leisurely stroke under a canopy of live oaks draped with Spanish moss in the Palmetto Bluff (palmettobluff) neighborhood of Bluffton, South Carolina. Palmetto Bluff is a picturesque community that sits in the heart of Lowcountry. Nestled along the May River, it’s abundant with beautiful walking trails, historic sites, and stunning views.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: There is no wrong time to visit Palmetto Bluff. However, we highly recommend sticking around for one of their spectacular sunsets.🛶 Things to do while there: Stop by Cole’s for some regionally inspired Southern fare, paddle board, kayak, or canoe along the May River, go saltwater fishing, take a tour at Bluffton Jack's Old Town Tours.🌊 Things to visit in the area: Palmetto Bluff Conservancy, Old Town Bluffton, Bluffton Oyster Factory Park, May River Sandbar, Heyward House Museum and Welcome Center (heywardhouse).📆 Best time of the year to visit: For the best weather, we recommend visiting between March and May or from September to November.🏨 Where to stay: The Montage Palmetto Bluff Resort (montagepalmettobluff) is the only resort in Palmetto Bluff. However, there are plenty of places to stay in the surrounding areas including: Old Town Bluffton Inn (oldtownblufftoninn), The Inn & Club at Harbour Town (theinnandclubatharbourtown), Sonesta Resort Hilton Head Island (sonestahhi).Photo by jpgriceoz
Reposted from coastaldiscoverymuseum Hilton Head Island has the second highest tidal range on the East Coast, second only to Canada’s Bay of Fundy. The average tidal range here is 7-9 feet between high and low tides.The Salt Marsh is one of our area’s most prominent features, not to mention an essential resource. Most coastal creatures depend partially or even fully on the Salt Marsh for survival as it serves as a nursery, as well as a water filter vital for the functioning of the entire coastal ecosystem.Explore the Lowcountry up close with a visit to the Coastal Discovery Museum and head out into the marsh via the Osprey Outlook floating dock on a self-guided tour or register for the weekly Salt Marsh Discovery program to learn from an expert how and why this particular environment is so important. (843) 689-6767 ext. 223 or coastaldiscovery.org.
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Sweet's Elderberry has arrived at indigo.mercantile in #GeorgetownSC!  Allergy-busting Sweet's Syrup (with raw Carolina honey), award-winning Shrub, unsweetened Extract and travel-friendly Tincture have joined the lineup at this GORGEOUS gourmet grocery.It features items from local farms including fresh eggs, grass-fed beef and just-picked strawberries, an extensive bottle shop with tastings, everyday items for kitchens, and fresh sandwiches for a quick lunch.  Be sure to check out their twin business just across the street, Indigo Bakery indigobakerytreats - YUM!#georgetown #sclowcountry #lowcountrylife #lowcountryliving #shoplocalsc #littlecharleston #gourmetgrocery #farmfreshsc #scgrown #beachtown
South Carolina lowcountry
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📸jonpuckett
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#southcarolina #southcarolinacoast #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #lifeonthecoast #coastliving #coastalsouthcarolina #saltyair #saltlife #wildlife #wildlifephotography #spanishmoss #sunrisesunset #charleston
Magnolia Plantation and Gardens
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#magnoliaplantation #southcarolina #southernliving #southernview #southernlife #sclowcountry #scenicviews #charlestonlife #charlestonliving #charlestonsc #coastalsouthcarolina #coastaliving #lifeonthecoast #lifeincharleston #spanishmoss #explorethecoast #exploretheoutdoors #godscreation #getoutside
It’s my last week in the Lowcountry. I will be incredibly happy to be back home, but I will sure miss these views. ☀️🌴[Image Description: a photo of a sun setting over the Lowcountry wetlands. The cloud in the sky are reflected on the water below.]
I'm wringing this chamois for all its worth. The diversity of subjects at this place is endless.#ilfordfp4 #lowcountryphotographer #southernconversations #sclowcountry #lowcountryscenes #saltmarsh #bnwmood #mediumformatfilm #silvervisionfilm
Need a project this weekend? Add a splash of color and touch of gardening to your porch decor. Don’t have a green thumb? Not to worry.⠀
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Visit southernlivingplantcollection for great tips, inspiration, and even purchase your plants on-line!⠀
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Excited to announce that I have joined the best team in the land business, Whitetail Properties Real Estate! Whitetail Properties is a national real estate company that specializes in hunting, timber, and farm land. As a Land Specialist, I will be here to provide professional real estate representation to both buyer and sellers in South Carolina.If you have looking to buy or sell a piece of property or just want to learn more about the company, give me a call, I'd love to hear from you!#whitetailproperties
#sclowcountry
#land

The South Carolina Lowcountry Guidebook is filled with many things to see and do in the beautiful Lowcountry of South Carolina. Please fill out the information and we will send you a FREE GUIDE BOOK.


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