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Jasper County

Revolutionary Roots

Named after young revolutionary war hero Sergeant William Jasper, Jasper County is close to Savannah, Hilton Head and Beaufort. It still maintains the simple, original flavor of the Lowcountry.

altWith roots dating back to the late 17th century, Jasper County is steeped in history with both important Revolutionary and Civil War sites scattered throughout.

Moderately priced accommodations and recreation make for a good base from which to explore the Lowcountry region. Golfers can play an entire weekend in Jasper County for less than the fees charged for a day elsewhere.

Off the coast are many beautiful remote barrier islands accessible only by boat that beckon to be explored. Nature lovers will enjoy viewing wildlife at such sites as the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge and the Tillman Sand Ridge Heritage Preserve.

Festivals are a big part of Jasper County and a great opportunity to soak up the local ambience. In Ridgeland, you can partake in the Gopher Hill Festival, the first weekend in October, where authentic Lowcountry cooking, hand-made crafts and other events make for fun for the whole family. The Jasper Jamboree is the second weekend in February and the Native American Pow-Wow is the second week in March.

altInterstate 95 North of Savannah runs through the heart of Jasper County and its seven exits offer a variety of accommodations, restaurants, and service businesses for travelers.

In the heat of battle during a Revolutionary War skirmish in South Carolina, a young American soldier performed a brave act. Seeing that the South Carolina flag had fallen to the ground, he leaped over the wall of the fort, secured the flag and then safely returned to his post to fight gallantly with his company. This simple, brave action brought notoriety to Sergeant William Jasper.

 

The people of this spirited and independent county at the southern tip of South Carolina chose Sergeant Jasper as their namesake. The deed for which he has been immortalized seems to symbolize both the simple hardiness of the land and the rugged spirit of the people who inhabit it.

altThrough the years, Jasper County has become known as a sportsman’s paradise. Its 662 square miles are dotted with a number of hunting clubs and plantation grounds housing large population of wildlife. From ducks to alligators to marsh hens, the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge is the home of an amazing variety of wild species. And, Jasper County’s long border on the Savannah River, its fresh-water  and salt-water rivers all make perfect hunting, fishing and recreational areas.

Historic Sites to Visit

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Jasper County is a part of the South Carolina Lowcountry known for its unique history and natural assets. Neighbor to both the old-world ports of Savannah and Charleston, and to thriving resorts such as Hilton Head Island on the Beaufort County coast, Jasper County has somehow managed to retain the simple, original flavor of the Lowcountry.

Important moments in history are permanently etched into historic sites still visible in the area. Valuable archeological digs date the history of the area back to ancient Indian tribes, while the site of an early Swiss settlement stands as a reminder of pre-colonial days.

 

Thomas Hayward, a Revolutionary War statesman and signer of the Declaration of Independence lived and died in Jasper County, and Civil War heroes fought here for their respective causes.

All types of wetland waterfowl, along with numerous alligators, call the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge home along the Savannah River border with neighboring Georgia. Jasper County’s many fresh-water lakes, streams and salt water rivers make ideal fishing territory, while hunters come from a number of other states each year for the excellent deer, quail and boar hunting.

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The Jasper County Chamber of Commerce is located next to the Jasper County Courthouse in downtown Ridgeland. Its Visitors Center and the Webel Museum invite you to come discover some of the area’s intriguing past and today’s special events.

The Hardeeville Chamber of Commerce welcomes you to visit and will be glad to help you with accommodations convenient to I-95, Savannah, Hilton Head and the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge. The phone numbers and addresses of the chambers are found on page 8 of this guide book.

 

Jasper County Attractions

Blue Heron Nature Trail
Behind Comfort Inn, Ridgeland, Exit 21. (843)726-8148. Allows visitors the opportunity for a short stroll or extended adventure. The trail bed is constructed of ground recycled South Carolina tires & encircles a beautiful three-acre lake. The site has several docks from which visitors can feed large fish, turtles & ducks, as well as an extensive butterfly garden & a boardwalk through native wetlands.

Pauline Pratt Webel Museum
403 Russell Street, Ridgeland
(843)726-8126. Offers a wonderful eclectic collection of artifacts, prints andalt
other items… from ancient Indian pottery & arrow points to Civil War memorabilia.

Pratt Memorial Library
451A Wilson Street, Ridgeland
(843)726-7744. More than 200 portraits & maps relating to the Lowcountry, 250 rare books on area history & many Native American artifacts, mostly from Jasper County.

Purrysburg MonumentPurrysburg Monument
Hwy. 34 & 203, 2 miles west of Hardeeville, Purrysburg Road. Lonely, cross-shaped monument on the Savannah River banks marks the site of a 1731 Swiss settlement.

Savannah National Wildlife Refuge
US 17, Jasper County, (912)652-4415.
Established 1927, protects old rice fields & numerous species of wildlife including ducks, birds, deer, & alligators. Free 4-mile driving tour, sunrise to sunset. Tour buses call in advance.

Sergeant Jasper Park
(843)784-5130, near Hardeeville.

130 acres, picnic shelters, lake fishing.
Banquet Room available.

Argent Steam EngineSteam Engine No. 7

Main Street, Hardeeville.

Once a workhorse of Argent Lumber Company operating in Hardeeville, the engine is a 1910 model & was actively used until 1957.

Thomas Heyward, Jr., Tomb

Thomas Heyward TombHwy. 278 & 462 junction.

Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Heyward
(1749-1809) lies buried at Old House Plantation. Free, open daily.