Ridgeland

Ridgeland

Blue Heron Nature Trail GazeboBlue Heron Nature Trail
321 Bailey Ln. (I-95, Exit 21) (843)726-7611
Allows visitors the opportunity for a short stroll or extended adventure. The trail bed is constructed of ground recycled South Carolina tires & encircles a beautiful three-acre lake. The site has several docks from which visitors can feed large fish, turtles & ducks, as well as an extensive butterfly garden & a boardwalk through native wetlands. Read our Blue Heron Nature Trail Blog.

Jasper County Courthouse
358 Third Ave.
The massive Jasper County Courthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and has been the first and only center of county government since it was built in 1915. Ridgeland, the county seat, lies in the center of the county.

Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage
10782 S. Jacob Smart Blvd. (US 17)
(843) 284-9227
The Center advances education and engagement initiatives that preserve the Lowcountry`s history and culture through projects, events and exhibitions that inspire interest and evoke inquiry. The Trust creates a vibrant center where a wide diversity of people gather to explore and learn about the region`s distinctive sense of place.

Pauline Pratt Webel Museum & Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center
403 Russell St. (843)726-6544
Offers a wonderful eclectic collection of artifacts, prints and other items… from ancient Indian pottery & arrow points to Civil War memorabilia.

Pratt Memorial Library
451 Wilson St.
(843)726-7744
More than 200 portraits & maps relating to the Lowcountry, 250 rare books on area history & many Native American artifacts, mostly from Jasper County.

Jasper County Area

Jasper County Area

Jasper County Area

Revolutionary Roots

Named after young revolutionary war hero Sergeant William Jasper, Jasper County is close to Savannah, Hilton Head and Beaufort. It still maintains the simple, original flavor of the Lowcountry.

With roots dating back to the late 17th century, Jasper County is steeped in history with both important Revolutionary and Civil War sites scattered throughout.

Moderately priced accommodations and recreation make for a good base from which to explore the Lowcountry region. Golfers can play an entire weekend in Jasper County for less than the fees charged for a day elsewhere.

Off the coast are many beautiful remote barrier islands accessible only by boat that beckon to be explored. Nature lovers will enjoy viewing wildlife at such sites as the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge and the Tillman Sand Ridge Heritage Preserve.

Festivals are a big part of Jasper County and a great opportunity to soak up the local ambiance. In Ridgeland, you can partake in the Gopher Hill Festival, the first weekend in October, where authentic Lowcountry cooking, hand-made crafts and other events make for fun for the whole family. The Jasper Jamboree is the second weekend in February and the Native American Pow-Wow is the second week in March.

Interstate 95 North of Savannah runs through the heart of Jasper County and its seven exits offer a variety of accommodations, restaurants, and service businesses for travelers.

In the heat of battle during a Revolutionary War skirmish in South Carolina, a young American soldier performed a brave act. Seeing that the South Carolina flag had fallen to the ground, he leaped over the wall of the fort, secured the flag and then safely returned to his post to fight gallantly with his company. This simple, brave action brought notoriety to Sergeant William Jasper.

The people of this spirited and independent county at the southern tip of South Carolina chose Sergeant Jasper as their namesake. The deed for which he has been immortalized seems to symbolize both the simple hardiness of the land and the rugged spirit of the people who inhabit it.

Through the years, Jasper County has become known as a sportsman’s paradise. Its 662 square miles are dotted with a number of hunting clubs and plantation grounds housing large population of wildlife. From ducks to alligators to marsh hens, the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge is the home of an amazing variety of wild species. And, Jasper County’s long border on the Savannah River, its fresh-water  and salt-water rivers all make perfect hunting, fishing and recreational areas.

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Historic Sites to Visit

Jasper County is a part of the South Carolina Lowcountry known for its unique history and natural assets. Neighbor to both the old-world ports of Savannah and Charleston, and to thriving resorts such as Hilton Head Island on the Beaufort County coast, Jasper County has somehow managed to retain the simple, original flavor of the Lowcountry.

Important moments in history are permanently etched into historic sites still visible in the area. Valuable archaeological digs date the history of the area back to ancient Indian tribes, while the site of an early Swiss settlement stands as a reminder of pre-colonial days.

Thomas Heyward, a Revolutionary War statesman and signer of the Declaration of Independence lived and died in Jasper County, and Civil War heroes fought here for their respective causes.

All types of wetland waterfowl, along with numerous alligators, call the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge home along the Savannah River border with neighboring Georgia. Jasper County’s many fresh-water lakes, streams and salt water rivers make ideal fishing territory, while hunters come from a number of other states each year for the excellent deer, quail and boar hunting.

The Jasper County Chamber of Commerce is located next to the Jasper County Courthouse in downtown Ridgeland. Its Visitors Center and the Webel Museum invite you to come discover some of the area’s intriguing past and today’s special events.

The Hardeeville Chamber of Commerce welcomes you to visit and will be glad to help you with accommodations convenient to I-95, Savannah, Hilton Head and the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge. The phone numbers and addresses of the chambers are found on page 8 of this guide book.

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Jasper County Attractions

Click on the name of the attraction for more information.

Blue Heron Nature Trail
Behind Comfort Inn, Ridgeland, Exit 21. (843)726-8148. Allows visitors the opportunity for a short stroll or extended adventure. The trail bed is constructed of ground recycled South Carolina tires & encircles a beautiful three-acre lake. The site has several docks from which visitors can feed large fish, turtles & ducks, as well as an extensive butterfly garden & a boardwalk through native wetlands. Read our Blue Heron Nature Trail Blog.

Frampton Plantation Museum House and SC Lowcountry Tourism Commission
842-717-3090, (1 Frampton Dr, off I-95 Exit 33, opens daily 8:30-5)
This plantation house was originally built in the 1700’s as part of an original King’s Grant. The plantation contained thousands of acres, producing Sea Island cotton and rice. The owner, John Frampton, served as a delegate in the 1860 South Carolina Convention, and as such was a signer of the Ordinance of Secession. After the family fled, General Lee’s Confederate troops built an earthwork gun emplacement to help protect the railroad located behind the house. These mounds can still be seen behind the house today. Due to Frampton’s involvement in succession his plantation was targeted and burned during Sherman’s “March to the Sea”. Frampton, having fled the area, returned after the war with ample wealth to rebuild his home and continue farming. The house has been refurbished and is in use today as the Lowcountry Visitor Center and Museum. Picnic under 250 year old live oak trees that are dripping with Spanish moss. Frampton Plantation has picnic facilities including tables and trash cans. The plantation has restrooms, ample parking for campers and a dog walking area.  After lunch come inside and browse through the museum and visitor’s center.

Pauline Pratt Webel Museum
403 Russell Street, Ridgeland
(843)726-8126. Offers a wonderful eclectic collection of artifacts, prints and
other items… from ancient Indian pottery & arrow points to Civil War memorabilia.

Port Royal Sound Foundation
310 Okatie Hwy., (843)645-7774
Wherever you travel in Beaufort County and the surrounding area, you’ll likely cross the waters of Port Royal Sound. These waters are some of the most pristine in the country. The Port Royal Sound Foundation offers a variety of educational and recreational programs and exceptional events for all ages that are sure to enlighten, inform and delight.

Pratt Memorial Library
451A Wilson Street, Ridgeland
(843)726-7744. More than 200 portraits & maps relating to the Lowcountry, 250 rare books on area history & many Native American artifacts, mostly from Jasper County.

Purrysburg Monument
Hwy. 34 & 203, 2 miles west of Hardeeville, Purrysburg Road. Lonely, cross-shaped monument on the Savannah River banks marks the site of a 1731 Swiss settlement.

Savannah National Wildlife Refuge
US 17, Jasper County, (912)652-4415.
Established 1927, protects old rice fields & numerous species of wildlife including ducks, birds, deer, & alligators. Free 4-mile driving tour, sunrise to sunset. Over 40 miles of hiking and biking trails can also be found in the refuge. Tour buses call in advance. BLOG

Sergeant Jasper Park
(843)784-5130, near Hardeeville.
130 acres, picnic shelters, lake fishing.
Banquet Room available. Read our Sgt. Jasper Park Blog.

Steam Engine No. 7
Main Street, Hardeeville.
Once a workhorse of Argent Lumber Company operating in Hardeeville, the engine is a 1910 model & was actively used until 1957.

Thomas Heyward, Jr., Tomb

Hwy. 278 & 462 junction.
Thomas Heyward Jr (1746-1809), signer of the Declaration of Independence, was born and laid to rest at Old House Plantation. A half-mile avenue of oaks leads visitors to the family burial plot. The state of South Carolina erected a monument and bust of Heyward in 1920. He was a delegate in the Continental Congress. He was also a member of the SC Bar, a statesman, circuit court judge, and founder and first president of the Agricultural Society of SC. The last to survive among the South Carolina signers, he died in 1809 at the age of 62 and was interred in the family cemetery. Open to the public, this location is a quiet and restful spot to picnic and roam.

Purrysburg Monument

Argent Steam Engine

Thomas Heyward Tomb

Hilton Head Island

Hilton Head Island

Hilton Head Island

History of Hilton Head Island

Hilton Head Island is famous for its twelve-mile stretch of glistening sands. However, a visit here is much more than a day at the beach. There’s golf – perhaps more quality courses and programs than anywhere else on earth, including, of course, the RBC Heritage of Golf, one of the top events on the PGA Tour. And don’t forget tennis.

Then, too, there’s fishing, biking, boating, outlet shopping, rollerblading, horseback riding, nature watching, and a wealth of cultural and artistic activities to explore, and all that beach to enjoy.

History and nature are inextricably mixed on Hilton Head Island. The first islanders were Indians who lived here as early as 4000 B.C., supported by the rich bounty of earth and sea. In 1663, the fertile land of the New World drew English sea captain William Hilton to explore the Island on behalf of a syndicate of Barbadian planters. His report was enthusiastic, and in honor of his pioneering explorations, the Island was christened Hilton’s Head – a reference to the headlands that marked the way into Port Royal Sound. However, it was not until the threat of the Spaniards to the south and the Indians to the west was quelled in the closing years of the 17th century, that English colonists would settle permanently in the area.

As the 18th century dawned, the Island prospered with large indigo and, later, rice plantations. But it was sea island cotton – first successfully cultivated in the 1780s – that made the planters wealthy beyond their dreams. By the mid-1800s, at the height of the plantation era, more than a dozen large land-owning families divided the Island’s riches among themselves.

The onset of the Civil War brought an abrupt end to the cotton dynasties. The fine homes and fertile fields of the planters were destroyed by occupying Union troops after what would prove to be the largest naval engagement of the entire war: the Battle of Port Royal. A freedman’s village, Mitchelville, sprang up briefly, but its life was short, and when the Union troops left, the Island returned to a long period of bucolic quiet, with those who remained making a modest living farming, fishing and oystering.

Highly developed, yet in harmony with nature, Hilton Head has no billboards, neon signs, roller coasters or skyscrapers. In fact, no building can be higher than the trees. Signage ordinances keep signs low key and unobtrusive. Only 40,000 permanent residents live on the island, along with wildlife such as deer, osprey, pelicans, alligators, herons, and near-shore dolphins.

Be sure to visit the Coastal Discovery Museum located at 70 Honey Horn Drive. The museum features historical and ecological exhibits of Hilton Head Island’s colorful history and lush natural beauty and varied wildlife. Museum staff can tell you about upcoming environmental lectures and beach walks. Browse through the gift shop and make reservations for one of the historic or environmental tours hosted by the Museum.

The Arts Center of Coastal Carolina sponsors many ongoing activities and events. For information or a calendar of events, call the Center at 842-ARTS. The Coastal Discovery Museum sponsors nature walks, lectures and classes. For information call 689-6767.

The Hilton Head Art League sponsors ongoing exhibitions, lectures and workshops. For information call 843-681-5060.

Enjoy your visit to Hilton Head Island, an internationally known playground and family vacation spot.

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Hilton Head Area

Click on the name of the attraction for more information.

Audubon Newhall Preserve
Palmetto Bay Road, (843) 842-9246
Audubon Newhall Preserve is a beautiful inland park on Hilton Head Island. It has a number of nice hiking trails winding their way through the woods. There are benches placed along the path. The center of the trail contains a scenic pond and wetland and boardwalk. In this 50-acre preserve, many native plants & many birds have been identified. Dogs are welcome on these trails.  According to the trail guide, “The Audubon Newhall Preserve was established in 1965 as the Island Wildlife Preserve, when Caroline “Beany” Newhall, (recognizing the need to conserve woodlands,) persuaded Charles Fraser of the Sea Pines Company to deed 50 acres of land for the preserve.”

Coastal Discovery Museum At Honey Horn
70 Honey Horn Dr. (843)689-6767
Honey Horn consists of 68 acres of breathtaking natural beauty and a dozen historic structures scattered throughout the property. Guided Walks and Terrace Talks teach of the varied nature and rich history of the area. An art gallery and interactive exhibits are found in the main structure.
Read our Coastal Discovery Blog.

Harbour Town Lighthouse
This beautiful marina is located at the end of Lighthouse Road in Sea Pines Plantation.  See the Harbour Town Lighthouse, Harbour Town Yacht Basin and many charming boutiques and restaurants. Admission fee to Sea Pines.

Heritage Library Genealogy & History Center
2 Corpus Christi, Suite 100, (843)686-6560
The Heritage Library offers research assistance on ancestry, along with classes and tours focused on Hilton Head Island’s history from prehistory to the modern era. The Heritage Library owns two historic sites, Ft. Mitchel and the Historic Zion Cemetery & Baynard Mausoleum.

Mitchelville Freedom Park
226 Beach City Road, (843) 255-7301
Visit Hilton Head’s historic Mitchelville freedom Park. This is the site of the first settlement for former slaves. This park is very important in the history of freedom towns that were established during the Reconstruction era. Tour the park at your own pace or join a tour group.

Old Zion Cemetery
574 Wm. Hilton Pkwy,
Grave sites of families of prominent Lowcountry Sea Island cotton plantations, most pre-dating 1860. Site of the Zion Chapel of Ease, part of the Angelican St. Luke’s Parish, established 1767.

Sea Pines Forest Preserve
The Sea Pines Forest Preserve is a 605 acre protected area for wildlife habitat and outdoor exploration in the heart of Sea Pines. The preserve includes bridle paths, wetland boardwalks, bridges and fishing docks. (843)671-7170, (800)732-7463

Hardeeville

Hardeeville

Hardeeville Dog Park
285 John Smith Road, downtown Hardeeville
843-227-4089
Bring your dog to the Hardeeville Dog Park and spend the afternoon off-leash without worries. The park is divided into three areas for small, large, and senior dogs ages 7 and older.  The park also has a water fountain for dogs.

Hardeeville Recreation Center
285 John Smith Road
843-227-4089
This state of the art 35,000 square foot facility has a fully equipped fitness center, indoor walking track, basketball courts, Tai Chi classes, yoga and much, much more.

Millstone Landing
 55 Millstone Landing Rd, (843) 784-2231
This boat landing is a great spot for a picnic along the banks of the Savannah River. The landing also offers boaters and anglers access to one of the South’salt best fishing spots. To reach Millstone Landing, turn west at the intersection of U.S. 17 and SC 46, cross the tracks, and continue straight across U.S. 321. Follow Church Road to its T-intersection with Purrysburg Road and turn left; the landing is on the right.

 

Purrysburg Monument
Hwy. 34 & 203, 2 miles west of Hardeeville, Purrysburg Road.
Purrysburg was founded in 1732 by Swiss Huguenots but failed due to competition from nearby Savannah. A cross marks the settlement’s location on the Savannah River today, celebrating Hardeeville’s earliest history. To reach the cross, from Millstone Landing, turn north on Purrysburg Road and watch for the historic marker on your left, past Church Road.

 

Savannah National Wildlife RefugeSav Nat Wildlife Refuge
694 Beech Hill Ln, Hardeeville, Jasper County

(843) 784-2468
Make the beautiful Savannah National Wildlife Rescue Visitor Center your first stop when visiting the refuge.  Open Monday – Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.; Closed Sundays and all federal holidays. Established 1927, this refuge protects old rice fields & numerous species of wildlife including ducks, birds, deer, & alligators. Free 4-mile driving tour, sunrise to sunset.

 

Sergeant Jasper Park
1458 Red Dam Rd, (843)784-5130, near Hardeeville
Parks and Recreation manages and maintains a hidden gem in Hardeeville (exit 8), known as Sgt. Jasper Park. The park is 321-acres and offers a variety of things to do such as biking, walking trails, fishing, kayaking, canoeing, birdwatching, picnicking, and disc golf.

 

Steam Engine No. 7Argent Steam Engine
205 Main Street, Hardeeville. Once a workhorse of Argent Lumber Company operating in Hardeeville, the engine is a 1910 model & was actively used until 1957.

Tillman Nature Trail

A nature trail offers access to the interior of the wonderful sand ridges and blackwater swamps of the Tillman Sand Ridge Wildlife Refuge. Hikers along the trail might spot the rare gopher tortoise if they’re observant. To reach the refuge from U.S. 17/SC 46, cross the railroad tracks and follow U.S. 321 north to Tillman; turn left at the flashing light in that crossroads town and follow that road to a sign for B&C Landing. Turn left there and follow the road to where it terminates at the nature trail.

Hampton County Area

Hampton County

Hampton County

Watermelon Capital

Once mapped as “Indian Lands”, this county of deep forests, swamps, and ponds is today famous to many sportsmen, hunters and fishermen for its exceptional hunting grounds and excellent river and creek fishing.

Not only does the Lowcountry offer one of the longest hunting seasons in the country, it also contains the largest whitetailed deer populations in the state.

Evidence of this area’s first residents, the native Indians can still be seen through such fascinating river names as the Salkehatchie, the Combahee and the Coosawhatchie. Hunting for Indian artifacts is a popular pastime, especially over a freshly plowed field after a good rain where many an arrowhead or pottery shard can be discovered.

The town of Hampton is the county seat, named after General Wade Hampton, an important Civil War military leader and  state governor. Hampton, along with its sister town of Varnville are the hosts of the annual Hampton County Watermelon Festival, South Carolina’s oldest continuing festival dating back to 1939. Hampton County is a major producer of watermelons in the state and each June over 60,000 visitors come to help celebrate and enjoy this delicious summertime crop.

Yemassee, just one mile off Interstate 95, hosts an annual Shrimp Festival in September, celebrating the abundance of shrimp caught locally each year and featuring a boat parade, kiddie rides and unique shrimp cuisine. Furman, Estill and Gifford are hosts to spring, summer and fall festivals. Brunson is host to a “Fun Day” for you and Varnville celebrates with a “Day in the Park”.

Recreation abounds at Lake Warren State Park, a 1,390 acre fishing, boating and picnic area. Nature lovers can view alligators and water birds from the pier or along the lake’s edge.

Other attractions throughout this county of friendly rural towns are farms and numerous antebellum plantation homes, historic churches and cemeteries. There are many Places to Go and Things to See in Hampton County.

Unique sights to see include the Webb Wildlife Center, Hampton’s town and county museums (both in historic buildings), and the town of Varnville which was the setting for 1930s scenes from the movie “Forrest Gump.” The Hampton Museum & Visitors Center is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Hampton County Attractions

Click on the name of the attraction for more information.

Brunson’s Famous Town Hall
The Brunson Museum and Visitor Center was cited in “Ripley’s Believe It or Not” as being the only stilted, octagonal town hall in the world. Built on stilts in 1906, the town hall provided shade to an artesian well. Benches were placed around it to provide a recreational spot. Over the years, the tiny town hall was encroached by the modern highway and railway systems, so in 1959, it was removed from its stilts and moved to its current location. The building continued to serve as the center of town government until 1996. The museum offers a wonderful collection of artifacts, photographs, paintings, and other memorabilia documenting the history of Brunson and the surrounding area.
Although no longer on stilts, it stands tall and proud as a landmark of this once “largest town” on the Charleston & Western Railroad.
800 Railroad Avenue, Brunson

Hampton’s American Legion Hut
This home of American Post 108, located at 302 Hoover St South, was built of cypress logs in 1933. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Hampton County Courthouse
This “Temple of Justice” is on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in 1878, the same year the SC General Assembly declared this northern portion of Beaufort County its own separate county. Hwy 278.

Hampton County Museum
702 First Street West, Hampton, (803)943-3387 or (803)943-5484, Th 10am-noon & 4-7pm, Sun 3-5pm. Housed in the former Hampton Jailhouse building, operated & maintained as a joint effort by Hampton County & the Historic Society. Contains a Civil War memorabilia, including various maps, uniforms, photographs of the county, its people & their ancestors.

Hampton Museum & Visitors Center
15 Elm Street East, Hampton, (803)943-5318
This museum contains military artifacts, as well as a children’s room. Exhibits antique medical equipment donated by local physicians & a section dedicated to ethnic cultures of the Lowcountry. Local craftsmen & artisans also contribute to continuous rotating exhibits. On National Register of Historic Places.

Hampton Walking Tour
Leaves from Hampton Museum & Visitors Center or Chamber of Commerce Offices, 15 Elm Street East, Hampton. (803)943-5318 or (803)943-3784. Peaceful walking tour of a small southern town’s historic buildings, elegant gardens & quaint shops.

Lake Warren State Park
Located off Hwy. 601 South, (803)943-5051. 400-acre park offers pier fishing, boating, picnicking, & nature viewing on a shady lake. Open dawn to dusk.

Lawtonville Baptist Church
Corner of 2nd & Lawton Avenue, Estill, (803)625-2871. Constituted in 1775, boasts pictures, brochures & interesting artifacts of Hampton County’s past.

Lawtonville Cemetery
Circa 1819. Site of Lawtonville Village (destroyed by Gen. Sherman’s troops). View remains of masonry staircase of one of the oldest Baptist churches in South Carolina. Near Estill.

Palmetto Theater
108 Lee Avenue, Hampton. Circa 1946. Built in the Art Deco influenced Art Moderne style that became popular after the war. When supplies were hard to come by, this style evolved to use an artistic approach to cheaper building materials. The results were stunning.

Stoney Creek Presbyterian Chapel
25481 Pocotaligo Rd, Circa 1832. Built in the high piney woods in McPhersonville. Plantation owners & their families had summer residences here. Many gave up portions of their property to provide place of worship. The chapel was also used as a hospital during the Civil War.

Town of Varnville
Originally known as “Dixie”, circa 1800. View lovely old homes. It was said that the aristocrats settled in Varnville. One of the original founders, James Varn, operated a sawmill. Scenes from the movie “Forrest Gump” were filmed here. Town Park features gazebo and restored caboose.

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Hampton Museum

Edisto Beach

Edisto Beach in South Carolina

When you reach the end of scenic byway SC Highway 174, you will arrive at Edisto Beach. Edisto, pronounced “EH dis tow”, is one of the most serene beaches found on the South Carolina coast. By water, Edisto Beach is located in St. Helena Sound where the ACE Basin meets the Atlantic Ocean. Travel by land or sea to reach this destination is truly a delightful stroll through nature at its finest. By land, the meandering Highway 174 takes you through and over marshes and rivers under a tranquil canopy of graceful oaks threaded with Spanish moss. By water, the ACE Basin offers abundant wildlife including majestic wood storks, egrets, herons and an American bald eagle or two if you are so lucky. The sea creatures that you may encounter can include dolphins, sea otters, alligators and a variety of fish to delight any angler.

 

The beach itself is “gently” developed with low-level beach houses situated along 4.5 miles of uncrowded, pristine beach, beside the many tidal creeks and rivers and throughout the interior. Countless families have spent generations of vacations exploring the natural beauty this special place has to offer. With its laid-back lifestyle and quiet, yet breath-taking, natural setting, this sea island destination provides everyone a chance to enjoy the slower pace of days gone by.

Visit the Edisto Chamber’s website at www.EdistoChamber.com or check out the links below.

 

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Playing in the water

 

Attractions on Edisto Beach and Around the Island


3706 Dock Site Rd. This park is owned by the Town of Edisto Beach and is an excellent place to try your hand at fishing or crabbing off the dock. There are open areas for a family picnic or a romantic walk with a spectacular view of the marsh surrounding Big Bay Creek. There is an intreperative center there and on Wednesdays, they have an Arts and Crafts and Farmers Market, weather permitting. Bay Creek Park is also a great venue for different festivals during the year.

Botany Bay Plantation
Hwy 174, Edisto Island, (843)953-9300. Botany Bay Plantation, a 4,630-acre tract located on Edisto Island, is now open for public access. The ecologically and historically significant property was privately maintained until recently by former owner, Margaret Pepper. The late Mrs. Pepper preserved the natural integrity of the land and fostered a diverse array of habitats including maritime forests, salt marsh, tidal creeks, freshwater ponds and hammock islands. The tract is now managed by S.C. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) as a part of the agency’s Wildlife Management Area (WMA) program. DNR’s stewardship of the property will continue Peppers’ customary legacy towards enhancing habitat for all wildlife species while providing public access including compatible educational and recreational opportunities and uses of the land. Read our Blog Post on Botany Bay for more images and information.

Edisto Beach State Park and Interpretive Center
Edisto Beach State Park features trails for hiking and biking that provide a wonderful tour of the park. The park’s environmental education center is a “green” building with exhibits that highlight the natural history of Edisto Island and the surrounding ACE Basin. With the theme “Choosing to Protect Our Coast,” the Edisto Interpretive Center helps promote the wise use of coastal resources. It is headquarters for Edisto Beach State Park’s interpretive programs and curriculum-based field studies, and for the S.C. Department of Natural Resources’ education and research services.
(843)869-4330 (photo by Wendie Smith)

Edisto Island Museum
8123 Chisolm Plantation Rd,(843)869-1954
Exhibits of sea island plantation life, Civil War & Native American displays.
Admission Fee.

Edisto Island Serpentarium
1374 Hwy 174, Edisto Island (843)869-1171
The Edisto Island Serpentarium is a culmination of more than 50 years of snake hunting adventure and experience by brothers Ted and Heyward Clamp of Edisto Island, SC. The modern indoor facility and beautifully landscaped outdoor gardens house a wide variety of reptiles, mostly those collected by the Clamp brothers and native to the southeastern United States. The reptiles in the outdoor gardens are not displayed behind glass but are viewed by visitors who look over low-walled enclosures to observe the snakes living in streams, climbing in trees or basking on stumps or logs exactly as they would be seen if encountered in the wild. Read our Blog Post on the Edisto Island Eerpentarium.

8675 Willtown Rd, Hollywood, (843)889-3084
Originally built by George Washington Morris in 1828, the plantation house has passed through multiple hands until acquired by US Fish & Wildlife Service in 1992. Today, the house is one of the few antebellum mansions left in the area after the Civil War. Come tour the historical home and rice fields today!

Old First Baptist Church
1644 SC Hwy 174, Edisto Island, (843)631-5040
This Church was founded and built in 1818 by the wife of an Edisto plantation owner, Hephzibah Jenkins Townsend. Many slaves worshiped here, and after the Civil War it was turned over to the African-American congregation. Descendants of 19th century members continue to worship today in the New First Baptist Missionary Church next door. The building is currently used by the Episcopal Church on Edisto.

The Plantation Course at Edisto
19 Fairway Dr, Edisto Beach (843)869-1111. The sole golf course on the island enjoys an interesting history dating back to its origin in 1973.  Originally known as ‘Oristo’ and later as ‘The Edisto Beach Golf Club’, the course takes pride in its new name…. ‘The Plantation Course at Edisto’.

Presbyterian Church on Edisto
2164 SC Hwy 174, Edisto Island, (843)869-2326
Established in 1685, the Presbyterian Church on Edisto Island is one of the oldest Presbyterian churches in the country. Tourists and genealogical researchers often frequent its historic graveyard, which dates back to 1787 and is the final resting place of many Edisto Island natives.

Trinity Episcopal Church
1589 SC Hwy 174, Edisto Island, (843)869-3568
Founded in 1774, the present church, consecrated in 1881, stands on the sight of the old sanctuary. The church was occupied by federal troops during the Civil War, destroyed by fire in 1876 and damaged by the hurricane of 1893. The sanctuary was rebuilt and features beautiful interior work done by a former slave. The old bead-board and blown glass windows have been lovingly preserved.

 

 

 

 

Bay Creek Park

Botany Bay Icehouse

EB Sunset WSmith

Big Alligator Edisto Serpentarium

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Explore Daufuskie Island

Daufuskie Island

Daufuskie Island is only thirty minutes from Hilton Head by boat, and an hour from Savannah, but it feels like you’re going back 100 years in time. Still sandy dirt roads reveal an island that is rich in history and nature with one of the most beautiful and fragile beaches on the East Coast. Discover Daufuskie Island’s Rich and Diverse History.

Native Americans lived on Daufuskie ten-thousand years ago leaving many artifacts that tell of their presence. Indians remained on Daufuskie until the 1800s.

The Spanish came to the Island in the 1500’s when Daufuskie was part of Florida bringing a building technique called “tabby” construction using oyster shells as a base. The Spaniards left a herd of sturdy small horses called “marsh tackys”.

Plantations were started in the late 1600’s and early 1700’s when England ruled South Carolina. For the most part, Daufuskie land grants were given to wealthy English families by the King of England. The early planters grew indigo, and later, long-staple sea island cotton. At the start of the Civil War, there were seven working plantations on Daufuskie Island, working many slaves.

Union forces captured Daufuskie in 1861. Thousands of troops were camped on Daufuskie during the Civil War until 1865. At the end of the War, Daufuskie was inhabited primarily by freed slaves. These residents, because of the isolation of the Island, kept a culture alive that would have disappeared decades ago. The culture is called “Gullah” and remains to this day on Daufuskie Island. The word “Gullah” may come from Angola, the African nation origin of many slaves.

In 1974 the famous motion picture, “Conrack”, was a story about Daufuskie Island based on the award-winning autobiographical book, The Water Is Wide, by Pat Conroy. This is a story which recounted Pat’s early days of teaching African-American children at the Island’s two-room schoolhouse in 1969. The school house is currently being used as a coffee shop and the Daufuskie Blues indigo dyeing studio and shop.

In 1984, Doctor Jack Scurry built the first Marina on Daufuskie Island. Soon after came the Haig Point and Melrose developments. With no airport or bridge on this isolated and beautiful island, Daufuskie is a rare gem that can be visited by private boats or public ferries.

Visitors travel paved roads in golf carts, watch the sun rise over the Atlantic from quaint beach cottages, or sprawling private homes. Outside the plantations, island residents travel dirt roads at a leisurely pace and enjoy the beauty of Daufuskie and a quiet lifestyle. There are memorable shops and restaurants on the island as well.

To get an idea about life on Daufuskie view Daufuskie Island Culture Video and Discover Daufuskie.

The Billie Burn Museum is located on Old Haig Point Rd. If you’re exploring Daufuskie Island, it’s always a good idea to start here. The museum is packed with artifacts and displays revealing the history of Daufuskie Island and its early inhabitants. Daufuskie Island Gullah are
descendants of slaves brought from West Africa to till the rice and cotton fields of the Carolina and Georgia Lowcountry.  Following Emancipation, former slaves returned to live on Daufuskie Island  With no bridge to the mainland, the continued isolation allowed their unique way of life to remain relatively unchanged until the mid 20th century with the arrival of electricity and telephones. (843) 384-6363

The Daufuskie Community Farm and Artisan Village has devoted its energy to passionately advocating sustainable living on Daufuskie Island.  With the initial introduction of the community farm that attracted those desiring to have a hands-on way of producing food for their community, a growing desire has occurred to make a difference.  The local community has contributed to the planning, construction, and growth of this thriving work by expanding the farm from animals into gardens, orchards, and the new Artisan Village!

The Robert Kennedy Historic Trail walk includes all historic sites of the island and winds its way around the island highlighting historically significant sites. Along the trail visitors will find the Billie Burn Museum, the Gullah Learning Center, tabby ruins, historic cemeteries & homes, and old logging railroad line.

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Walterboro & Colleton County

Walterboro & Colleton County

Walterboro & Colleton County

Walterboro offers the best of South Carolina with rich history, untouched nature, and small-town charm. Discover the Walterboro Wildlife Sanctuary, Discovery Center, SC Artisans Center, Colleton Museum & Farmers Market, Tuskegee Airmen Monument, the Bedon-Lucas House Museum, and plenty of shopping and dining options. walterborosc.org/visit.

Visit the Walterboro Welcome Center at the Discovery Center
100 S. Jefferies Blvd, (843)782-6081

ACE Trail – Colleton County

The trail head is located on a three acre site about 2 miles north of theintersection of US Hwy 17 and SC Hwy 303.  It is adjacent a CSX rail crossing in the Green Pond community.  Phase 1 of the trail will be run along an old abandoned Atlantic Coast Rail Road Line right
of way that parallels SC Hwy 303 for about 1.8 miles to Clover Hill Road.   The trail is ideal for walking, biking, general exercise and bird watching.
NATURE TRAILS BLOG POST

 

Bear Island Wildlife Management Area 
Bear Island is located in eastern Colleton County near Green Pond approximately 13 miles from U.S. Highway 17 off of Secondary Road S-15-26 (Bennett’s Point Road). Bear Island is managed to provide quality waterfowl habitat and to protect local endangered and migratory non-game species. Public recreational opportunities are provided for hunting, nature observation and fishing.

 Bedroom Bedon Lucas House BedroomThe Bedon-Lucas House Museum

Located in the historic district at 205 Church Street, this 1820’s “high house” was purchased and restored by the Colleton County Historical and Preservation Society. The interior has been preserved and features original heart of pine floors.
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Bee City

Highway 61, Cottageville
(843)835-5912
This honey bee farm, petting zoo, café and gift shop is an experience that all should have. See honey bees at work from a screened observation area. See the Wallabies, Coatimundis, Serval Cats, Cavies as well as many farm animals: Miniature horses and donkeys, turkeys, chickens, quail, pheasants, etc

The Colleton Museum & Farmers Market

506 E Washington Street, Walterboro, (843)549-2303 Tues-Fri, 10 am-5 pm. Sat, 12-4 pm. Located in the Historic District of Downtown Walterboro, the museum features a permanent collection that explores the county’s history from prehistoric times to the early 1900s. The museum also has an ongoing exhibit on “Animals of the ACE,” a natural history display featuring wild animals indigenous to the South Carolina Lowcountry. The museum also features changing art collections monthly. The Colleton Farmers Market offers fresh vegetables and fruits, local honey, local crafts, plants, baked goods, prepared food, music, and much more. The Colleton Farmers Market is open from May through October on Tuesdays from noon-6 pm and on Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm. In November and December the Market is only open on Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm.

colleton museum

Colleton County CourthouseColleton County Courthouse

101 Hampton Street, Walterboro. Completed
in the fall of 1822, the outside walls are three bricks (28″) thick. The first nullification meeting in South Carolina was held here in 1828, when Robert Barnwell Rhett called for the immediate secession of the state legislature in protest of Federal tax laws. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Donnelly Wildlife Management Area 

With more than 8,000 acres of diverse habitats, Donnelley Wildlife Management Area is a favorite Lowcountry destination for birders looking to run up their list of avian sightings. Located in Green Pond on land once used for rice cultivation, the property features a historic rice field system now managed to attract waterfowl and other migratory birds. Among its impressive resident and visitor population are roseate spoonbills, Eurasian wigeon ducks, red-cockaded woodpeckers, bald eagles, painted buntings and the rare sandhill crane.
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Colleton State Park

A paddler’s paradise, this Lowcountry park sits a short distance from I-95 and connects to Givhans Ferry State Park via 23 miles of blackwater river. Colleton State Park provides easy access to the Edisto River, one of the longest free flowing, blackwater rivers in the country, and serves as the headquarters for the Edisto River canoe and kayak trail.
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Edisto Nature Trail

Hwy 17 Jacksonboro
In addition to local flora and fauna, see historical landmarks such as the King’s Highway, (dating from the 1700’s) former rice fields, and an old phosphate plant site. The Edisto Nature Trail is a 1.5 mile loop trail that takes visitors along the Edisto River and through several different types of forests, from maritime to pine.
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Herd it Here Farm

541 Sullivans Ferry Road, Cottageville, (703)597-4839
This is a one-of-a kind agritourism destination that provides an enjoyable and educational experience for visitors of all ages.  Learn about alpacas, silkie chickens, fainting goats, and more.

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Hickory Valley Historic District

Church and Wichman Streets, Walterboro
The Hickory Valley Historic District is comprised of nineteen properties reflecting the diversity of Walterboro’s heritage. The majority of the properties in the district are residences constructed between 1821 and 1929 which includes a concentration of early homes dating from Walterboro’s heyday as a pineland resort village for lowcountry planters. The architectural styles in the district include Federal, Greek Revival, Victorian carpenter, Neo-Classical and Federal Revival. The district is important historically for its associations with Walterboro’s founders as well as with several generations of prominent Walterboro families. Listed in the National Register November 21, 1980.

 Pon Pon Chapel RuinsPon Pon Chapel

The Pon Pon Chapel Ruins are situated on what was once the Parkers Ferry Road, 1 mile from SC 64. One of two chapels of ease established by an Act of the General Assembly in 1725 to serve St. Bartholomew’s Parish. This chapel burned in 1801 & 1832. It was known as Burnt Church after 1832. The ruins today are enough to distinguish the chapel’s gracious features.
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South Carolina Artisans Center

334 Wichman Street, Walterboro, (843)549-0011. Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm, Sun 1pm-6pm.
The South Carolina Artisans Center is the premier travel destination in the Lowcountry for handcrafted art. Designated by our legislature as the “Official South Carolina Folk Art and Craft Center,” the retail center features the artwork of more than 300 of South Carolina’s finest, juried artists. We invite you to explore our handcrafted art from handpicked artists. See, touch, smell, taste, and shop…Representing over 200 of the State’s finest juried artists and craftsmen, demonstrations & exhibits.

Self-guided Tour of Historic WalterboroHistoric House in Walterboro

Walterboro, (843)538-4353.
Designed to walk you through a reminiscent portion of  Walterboro’s past blended with the lovely Southern charm of today’s lifestyle. Much  of the grace & charm of the early settlers’ lifestyle remains tangible, as evidenced by  Walterboro’s architectural styles. The city abounds with fine examples of 18th  Century structures. Four buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places,  several more seek registration. Brochures available at the Walterboro Welcome Center.
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Tuskegee Airmen Monument

Lowcountry Regional Airport, Hwy 17-A. During World War II, the Walterboro Army Airfield served as a training ground for the Army airmen including a group of the Tuskegee Airmen. A monument honoring the bravery & dedication of the Tuskegee Airmen was placed in Walterboro Army Airfield Memorial Park at the site of the original airfield in May 1997. This was also the site of a POW camp & base hospital.

Walterboro Library Society Building

803 Wichman Street, Walterboro. Now headquarters of the Colleton County Historical & Preservation Society, the “Little Library” was built in 1820 when the Library Society was established. The small frame building is an excellent example of Federal architecture. Listed on the National Register of Historical Places.

Walterboro National Historic District
Downtown Walterboro
The Walterboro Historic District is a significant collection of properties located near the center of the town of Walterboro. The majority of the properties in the district were constructed between ca.1800 and ca.1945 and represent a wide range of nineteenth and early twentieth century vernacular design. The district is primarily residential in character, but also includes religious, educational, and public buildings. The visual appearance of the district reflects the historical development of the town, which was one of several South Carolina pineland villages settled during the early nineteenth century by planters in search of a healthful climate. Listed in the National Register November 10, 1980.

Walterboro Wildlife Discovery Center

100 S Jefferies Blvd, Walterboro, (843)782-6081
The Walterboro Wildlife Center is an interpretive exhibit hall showcasing the plant and animal life in the Walterboro Wildlife Sanctuary and the Lowcountry. The 7,000 square foot discovery center coordinates with the Walterboro Wildlife Sanctuary.
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Walterboro Wildlife Sanctuary

Detreville Street, (843)538-4353
Comprised of over 800 acres of braided creek and  hardwood flats. The sanctuary offers an asphalt bike/ walking trail, a canoe/kayak-looped  trail, a beaver pond, a duck pond, a butterfly garden, wildlife food plots, and feeding stations. Bridges, boardwalks, and a natural walking trail,  including a portion of Charleston to Savannah Wagon/Stagecoach Road. A 10,000 square foot Discovery Center is planned. The Sanctuary is open from daylight until dark every day and there is no charge. Information may be obtained by calling (843)549-2545. Free tours – groups welcome.
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Bluffton Area | Old Town Bluffton

Bluffton Sights to See

Bluffton Sights to See

Click on the name of the attraction for more information.

Bluffton Oyster Factory Park
63 Wharf Street, Old Town Bluffton.
Located on the May River in Old Town Bluffton, the park celebrates the oldest continuous operating oyster shucking facility in South Carolina. Opened in the early 1900’s, the 4.5 acre site on the pristine May River was purchased by the Beaufort County Open Land Trust and has evolved into a community park. The Garvin-Garvey Freedman’s Cottage sits on the bluff overlooking the river. (843)757-4010

Bluffton Riverfront Pocket Park and Garden
End of Pritchard Street, Old Town Bluffton.
A living example of Bluffton’s River Overlay Protection District, this planted buffer provides visitors the opportunity to see how vegetated buffers along waterways protect water quality and enhance property aesthetics. (843)706-4500

Bluffton Shell Art Trail
Throughout Old Town Bluffton
The Shell Art Trail is a new cultural art exhibit. 21 unique fiberglass oyster sculptures have been placed throughout Old Town Bluffton. Each oyster is a true work of art, painted by a local artist. Download a digital map or print out your own Shell Art Trail Passbook and get ready to follow the trail to the most spectacularly decorated sculptures you’ve ever seen. A special plaque on each will provide you with a unique “oyster fact” in answer to questions in your Passbook.  Match questions and answers to increase your knowledge as you travel the Trail. Take lots of selfies along the way. Post them to your social media accounts, tag us @LowcountryOysterTrail, and use #LowCountryOysterTrail #heARTofBluffton #SeeShellsinBluffton. Visit the Lowcountry Oyster Trail website to download your trail map.

Calhoun Street Art District
Collection of art galleries clustered along Calhoun Street, in the center of Old Town Bluffton. (843)757-6293

Campbell Chapel AME Church
23 Boundary Street, Old Town Bluffton.
The Campbell Chapel AME Church is the oldest surviving church within the historic district of Bluffton. Constructed in 1853 by the Bluffton Methodist Episcopal Church, the property changed hands in 1874 when it was purchased by freedmen. The church is believed to have been built by slaves. (843)757-3652
Read our Campbell Chapel AME Blog.

Church of the Cross Episcopal
110 Calhoun St, Old Town Bluffton.
Tours available (843)757-2661. The beautiful and historic Church of the Cross was built in 1857. It survived an attack by a Federal gun boat in 1863, when Federal troops burned most of Bluffton.

Bridge and Wharf Streets, (843) 757-6293
Guided tours of the Garvin-Garvey Freedman’s Cottage, located on the High Bluff in Oyster Factory Park are available. Reservations are not required for guided tours on Tuesdays or Thursdays, unless you have a group of 10 or more. Tours last approximately 30 minutes and are offered as visitors arrive unless previously scheduled.

70 Boundary St. (843)757-6293. Built in 1841 as a summer cottage for a Lowcountry planter, the Heyward House is Southern Beaufort County’s only house museum and Bluffton’s official welcome center. It offers free information on things to see and do Also available are docent-guided tours of the site. Read our Heyward House Blog.

Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge 
Off Hwy. 278, between the bridges to Hilton Head Island. Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge contains 4,053 acres preserving salt marsh and maritime habitat. Historical marker commemorating Major General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. (843) 784-2468.

Society of Bluffton Artists
6 Church Street, Street, Bluffton. (843)757-6586, A co-op gallery of Bluffton artists and craftspeople, the Guild is located in the historic Planters Mercantile building. Featuring original paintings in various media and styles, hand-made pottery, jewelry, turned wood pieces, baskets and more.

Sawmill Creek Rd.
Thie 977 acre Victoria Bluff Heritage Preserve provides an escape from the crowds. The preserve contains an example of the pine-saw palmetto flatwoods community, which is rare in South Carolina. As the name suggests, the pine-saw palmetto community is dominated by longleaf and slash pine in the overstory and saw palmetto in the understory. The other community type located on the preserve is the mainland maritime forest. This community occurs adjacent to the saltwater creeks and is dominated by live oak, cabbage palm, and slash pine. The preserve provides an excellent area for birdwatching, particularly in the spring. Pine, yellow-throated, and yellow rumped warblers, white-eyed vireos, summer tanagers and flycatchers can be seen in a short time. White-tailed deer, fox and gray squirrels can also be observed.

Bluffton Area Sights

Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge

Beaufort & Port Royal Area

Beaufort & Port Royal

Because of the deep, safe harbor, two of the first European settlements in what would become the Colony of South Carolina were established in the mid-1500s. Beaufort, and sister-city, Port Royal occupy the lower half of Port Royal Island, and offer visitors a glimpse of historic sites and homes of the antebellum South.

Beaufort and Port Royal have quiet neighborhood streets, overhung by giant live oaks and Spanish moss it is perfect for walking tours or a narrated, horse-drawn carriage ride. Read our blogs on the Historic Homes of Beaufort’s Bay Street and More Architectural Treasures in Historic Beaufort.  Visitors can also take a self guided tour of the Historic Churches of Beaufort.

If you love seafood, Beaufort and Port Royal boast some of the best seafood restaurants in the State. Several festivals and events are held during the year that celebrate the heritage, food, culture, and environment that these two communities share.

One of the area’s two public beaches is located in Port Royal, The Sands is just across the Beaufort River from Parris Island and is a favorite place to view 4th of July fireworks. The ocean beach at Hunting Island State Park is a 17 mile drive east of Beaufort.

Full service marinas assist boaters and fishermen who enjoy the protected waters of the Intracoastal Waterway, or easy access to the open ocean for deep sea fishing and diving.

From antique shops to unique gift items to hand made chocolates are found in the quaint shopping districts of the two towns, along with waterfront dining and bed & breakfast inns in lovingly restored historic homes.
Nature lovers can take kayak tours, walk the long, marsh-front board walk and climb the tower overlooking the waterfront in Port Royal. Read our Cypress Wetlands Rookery, Henry Robinson Boardwalk and Sands Beach blog.

Be warned however, many visitors fall in love with our friendly towns and mild temperatures and find it hard to leave. In fact many return to make Beaufort, Port Royal and surrounding communities their new home.

For other nearby attractions, see: Sights to see in Beaufort / Port Royal; and see Tours.

 

cannon park
Port Royal Landing Marina July dawn

Beaufort/Port Royal Area

Click on the name of the attraction for more information.

Beaufort Arsenal Museum
713 Craven Street, (843)525-8500, Built in 1798 & expanded in 1852. As a result of the secessionist movement. Contains Civil War artifacts and exhibits on local history. 

Beaufort National Cemetery
1601 Boundary Street, (843)524-3925. One of the first cemeteries established during the Civil War, it is one of the few that contains the remains of both Confederate and Union soldiers.

Chapel of Ease
Land’s End Road, St. Helena’s Island
Built between 1742 and 1747 to serve the planters on St. Helena Island. In 1886, a forest fire destroyed part of the brick and tabby chapel. The ruins and a small graveyard remain.
BLOG POST

Charlesfort-Santa Elena National Historic Landmark
Parris Island. Visit the site of the early French and Spanish settlements. There is a small exhibit at the site; full exhibit at the Parris Island Museum.

Cypress Wetlands Trail
1700 Paris Ave, Port Royal
Cypress Wetlands Rookery Loop is a 0.8 mile loop trail located in Port Royal, that offers the chance to see wildlife and is good for all skill levels. The trail is primarily used for walking, nature trips, and birding and is best used from April until October. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash. The wetlands support abundant populations of native wildlife.  The trail around the wetland is a combination of boardwalk, paved trail, and roadside pedestrian and bike trail.
BLOG POST

Fort Frederick
601 Old Fort Rd, Port Royal
Fort Frederick Heritage Preserve is a 6-acre property owned by the SC Department of Natural Resources and Beaufort County. Fort Frederick is the oldest surviving tabby fort in South Carolina and the oldest known tabby structure in Beaufort County. Built by the British colonial government between 1733 and 1735, its most important contribution to history was over one hundred years later on Jan. 1, 1863, when people walked across a dock over the top of Fort Frederick to hear the first reading of the Emancipation Proclamation in the Southern states.  Visitors can enjoy lunch under a covered pavilion and read historical details on the interpretive signs. The property is open from dawn to dusk every day.
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Fort Fremont Preserve
Land’s End Road, St. Helena Island
unique example of a Spanish American War Endicott Era fortification built to protect the U.S. Naval Station in Port Royal.
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Located 17 miles from Beaufort, 2555 Sea Island Pkwy.
(843)838-2011. Lighthouse, cabins, camping, picnic shelters, lagoon fishing, boat ramp, nature programs, park store, gift shop, nature center, marsh boardwalk, admission fee.
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John Mark Verdier House
801 Bay Street, (843)379-6335. Operated by the Historic
Beaufort Foundation. Circa 1800. Built in the Federal style by one of Beaufort’s most successful merchants, it is an excellent example of an early Lowcountry home. Museum gift shop open.
BLOG POST

The Mather Museum & Interpretive Center
921 Ribaut Rd, Building #1, Beaufort, 843-379-2787
Located on the campus of the Technical College of the Lowcountry, this museum depicts the history of the Mather School and its founder Rachel Crane Mather. The school was founded in 1868, shortly after the civil war, to teach the daughters of the newly freed slaves how to read and write and become homemakers. The School remained open for 100 years, closing it’s doors in 1968 and becoming a state trade school and eventually the Technical College of the Lowcountry. Hours of operation: Tues-Fri 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Old Sheldon Church Ruins
Located at the junction of Highways 21 & 235.
1.7 miles north of the junction of Highways 21 & 17 near Gardens Corner. Sheldon Church has laid in ruin for more than 140 years. Its gable roof, pediment, windows & interior have disappeared, but the classic simplicity of its design still remains. Burned by Prevost’s British troops in 1779, and again during the Civil War it still serves as a religious center for special observances. Admission – Free.
DRIVING TOUR BLOG POST
OLD SHELDON RUINS GAIN PROTECTION BLOG POST
OLD SHELDON, THEN AND NOW BLOG POST

Parris Island Museum
Marine Corps Recruit Depot, 111 Panama St
(843)228-2951, Housed in the War Memorial Building, it is devoted to the portrayal of the history &  development of Parris Island and the Port Royal area along with the Marine Corps & recruit training facilities.

Pat Conroy Literary Center
601 Bladen St, (843)-379-7025
The Pat Conroy Literary Center cultivates a passionate and inclusive reading and writing community in honor of Pat Conroy, who dedicated his life to spreading his love for literature and writing to future generations.

Penn Center
16 Penn Center Circle, West, St. Helena Island, (843)838-2432. The 50-acre Penn School National Historic Landmark District features the York W. Bailey Museum as well as 18 other structures related to the education of African Americans, Reconstruction, and the Civil Rights Era. Enjoy a permanent exhibit, “Education for Freedom: the Penn School Experiment,” as well as temporary exhibits. The museum, housed in the newly renovated Historic Cope Industrial Building, includes four galleries and a gift shop.
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Port Royal Museum
1634 Paris Ave, (843)524-4333
Take a trip back in time when lowcountry living was centered around the harvesting of seafood from the local creeks and rivers.  Find out how the deepest natural port provided opportunities and inspired local craftsmen to build boats and trawlers and market their bounties to the world.

Port Royal Sound Foundation
310 Okatie Highway, (843)645-7774
The Port Royal Sound Foundation features exhibits, classrooms, hands-on learning spaces and other areas where you can learn about and celebrate Port Royal Sound. Enjoy diverse and fun opportunities to experience and connect with the Port Royal Sound Area. Come by the Maritime Center to see the animals in action every Saturday at 2pm! A naturalist will feed and discuss the critters in various tanks. Fun for kids and adults alike! Other activities include Saturdays on the Sound, Tuesday Talks, Eco Boat Tours, story times and art contests.

Spanish Moss Trail 
Lowcountry’s Rails to Trail located in the heart of Northern Beaufort County, SC. This 10 mile long hiking and biking trail is open for public enjoyment.  The trail is open dawn to dusk. The path is open for pedestrians and non-motorized transportation (Exception: motorized wheelchairs). There are six parking trail heads available. The trail is open to pets on a leash; pet-waste stations are available. The trail offers beautiful water and marsh views and coastal wildlife viewing. It is also open for recreational fishing on various trestles. There are two restroom facilities (Broome Lane and Parker’s Convenience Store.
Trail head access located at Clarendon Road, Depot Road, Westvine Drive, Broome Lane Access, Beaufort Plaza, Roseida Road, & Clarendon Road.
PART 1 BLOG POST
PART 2 BLOG POST

St. Helena’s Episcopal Church
505 Church Road, Beaufort, (843)522-1712
Established in 1712 as a colonial parish of the Church of England, St. Helena’s Episcopal Church is one of the oldest churches in America. The original church was built on the present site in 1724 and appears today as it did in 1842 following its final enlargement.
Brief History and Map
BLOG POST

Tabernacle Baptist Church/Robert Smalls Grave
901 Craven Street, Beaufort
Tabernacle Church was formed by African-American members of Beaufort Baptist Church after Federal Occupation of the town in 1861. Robert Smalls, a slave who during the Civil War became a Union Naval Captain and later a US Congressman is buried in the churchyard.
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huntingb-209Hunting Island Lighthouse

John Mark Verdier House

parrisisland1Parris Island

Mather School Museum & Interpretive Center

See what our visitors love about the
SOUTH CAROLINA LOWCOUNTRY

Use the #hashtag #sclowcountry to get your image featured!

The Lowcountry & Resort Islands Region of South Carolina includes the four, southern-most counties in the state, Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton, and Colleton, which are bordered on the east by the Atlantic Ocean and on the west by the Savannah River and the state of Georgia.

simplysoutherncottage keeps us in awe with each her projects. This bed swing refresh is one of our favorites!
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#bedswing #prettyinpink #backporchliving #backporch #porchdecor #cottagestyle #bhgprojectjoy #bhghome #slhomes #southernstyle #bohostyle #bohodecor #bohochic #lowcountryliving #summervillesc #realestate #summervillerealestate #visitsummerville #sclowcountry #explorechs #mysouthernliving #charlestonrealtor #charlestonsc #summervillerealtor #72soldsc #jimbrantleyrealtor ⠀
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Beautiful South Carolina Lowcountry
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#southcarolina #southcarolinacoast #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #lifeonthecoast #coastliving #coastalsouthcarolina #saltyair #saltlife #wildlife #wildlifephotography #spanishmoss #sunrisesunset
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South Carolina Lowcountry
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#southcarolina #southcarolinacoast #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #lifeonthecoast #coastliving #coastalsouthcarolina #saltyair #saltlife #wildlife #wildlifephotography #sunrisesunset #charleston
The shore gently recedes beneath the stunning Pawleys Island Pier. The unique island town, located about 25 miles south of Myrtle Beach and 70 miles north of Charleston, exudes laid-back, beachy vibes. Locals have definitely adopted an island state of mind and encourage visitors to as well. When you go, make sure to relax on the beach, explore the famous sand dunes, or fish in one of the many adjacent creeks.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: We guarantee that you’re going to want to spend a whole day here. We recommend getting to the beach at around 10am.🗓️ Best time of the year: Pawleys Island has the best weather during the spring and early summer months.🏖️ Things to do while there: Pawleys Island Nature Park, Pawleys Island Chapel, Hopsewee Plantation.🐠 Things to visit in the area: Brookgreen Gardens (brookgreen_gardens), take a walking ghost tour, Myrtle Beach (mymyrtlebeach), Harborwalk Marina, South Carolina Maritime Museum (southcarolinamaritimemuseum).🏨 Where to stay: The Oceanfront Litchfield Inn (oceanfrontlitchfieldinn), Litchfield Beach and Golf Resort (litchfieldbeachandgolf), Sea View Inn (seaviewinn), 620 Prince (620prince).Photo by qcphotographer
Headed down the road....Edisto Island.  #edisto #sclowcountry #trees #endofday  #beauty #islandsofsc
Spanish moss drapes the live oak trees that are ubiquitous to the Edisto Island area. Did you know that Edisto gets its name from the native Edistow people? The Edistow Native Americans were a sub tribe of the Cusabo indians, a group of Native Americans who lived along the Atlantic coast in South Carolina.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: Stop by mid-morning. That way you can explore the island, grab lunch, and stay for the amazing sunset if you choose.🏖️ Things to do while there: Edisto Environmental Learning Center, Boneyard Beach, Scott Creek Inlet, Big Bay Creek, SeaCow Eatery.☀️ Things to visit in the area: Jungle Road Park, Bay Creek Park, Otter Islands, Spanish Mount Point.📆 Best time of the year to visit: For warmer weather come anywhere from March-August.🏨 Where to stay: Fripp Island Golf & Beach Resort (frippislandrsrt), Seabrook Island Club (seabrook_sc), The Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort (kiawahresort), Charleston Kiawah Island/Andell Inn (andellinn).Photo by qcphotographer
Discover at your own leisure at the coastaldiscoverymuseum 🌳  From century-old buildings with storied pasts, to wooden boardwalks that stretch into the Jarvis Creek salt marsh, there's always something to explore!
South Carolina lowcountry
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📸jonpuckett
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#southcarolina #southcarolinacoast #lowcountry #lowcountryliving #sclowcountry #lifeonthecoast #coastliving #coastalsouthcarolina #saltyair #saltlife #wildlife #wildlifephotography #spanishmoss #sunrisesunset #charleston
Reposted from coastaldiscoverymuseum Hilton Head Island has the second highest tidal range on the East Coast, second only to Canada’s Bay of Fundy. The average tidal range here is 7-9 feet between high and low tides.The Salt Marsh is one of our area’s most prominent features, not to mention an essential resource. Most coastal creatures depend partially or even fully on the Salt Marsh for survival as it serves as a nursery, as well as a water filter vital for the functioning of the entire coastal ecosystem.Explore the Lowcountry up close with a visit to the Coastal Discovery Museum and head out into the marsh via the Osprey Outlook floating dock on a self-guided tour or register for the weekly Salt Marsh Discovery program to learn from an expert how and why this particular environment is so important. (843) 689-6767 ext. 223 or coastaldiscovery.org.
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#coastaldiscoverymuseum #honeyhorn #hiltonheadisland #saltmarshsaturday #hightide #lowtide #saltmarsh #ospreyoutlook #boardwalk #floatingdock #ecosystem #exploremore #familyfun #familyadventures #communitymuseum #smithsonianaffiliate #sclowcountry #lowcountrylife #visithiltonhead #discoversc
A visitor takes a leisurely stroke under a canopy of live oaks draped with Spanish moss in the Palmetto Bluff (palmettobluff) neighborhood of Bluffton, South Carolina. Palmetto Bluff is a picturesque community that sits in the heart of Lowcountry. Nestled along the May River, it’s abundant with beautiful walking trails, historic sites, and stunning views.⏰ Best time of the day to visit: There is no wrong time to visit Palmetto Bluff. However, we highly recommend sticking around for one of their spectacular sunsets.🛶 Things to do while there: Stop by Cole’s for some regionally inspired Southern fare, paddle board, kayak, or canoe along the May River, go saltwater fishing, take a tour at Bluffton Jack's Old Town Tours.🌊 Things to visit in the area: Palmetto Bluff Conservancy, Old Town Bluffton, Bluffton Oyster Factory Park, May River Sandbar, Heyward House Museum and Welcome Center (heywardhouse).📆 Best time of the year to visit: For the best weather, we recommend visiting between March and May or from September to November.🏨 Where to stay: The Montage Palmetto Bluff Resort (montagepalmettobluff) is the only resort in Palmetto Bluff. However, there are plenty of places to stay in the surrounding areas including: Old Town Bluffton Inn (oldtownblufftoninn), The Inn & Club at Harbour Town (theinnandclubatharbourtown), Sonesta Resort Hilton Head Island (sonestahhi).Photo by jpgriceoz
Magnolia Plantation and Gardens
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Thanks for the tag 📸trbtbone
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#magnoliaplantation #southcarolina #southernliving #southernview #southernlife #sclowcountry #scenicviews #charlestonlife #charlestonliving #charlestonsc #coastalsouthcarolina #coastaliving #lifeonthecoast #lifeincharleston #spanishmoss #explorethecoast #exploretheoutdoors #godscreation #getoutside
I'm wringing this chamois for all its worth. The diversity of subjects at this place is endless.#ilfordfp4 #lowcountryphotographer #southernconversations #sclowcountry #lowcountryscenes #saltmarsh #bnwmood #mediumformatfilm #silvervisionfilm
It’s my last week in the Lowcountry. I will be incredibly happy to be back home, but I will sure miss these views. ☀️🌴[Image Description: a photo of a sun setting over the Lowcountry wetlands. The cloud in the sky are reflected on the water below.]
Need a project this weekend? Add a splash of color and touch of gardening to your porch decor. Don’t have a green thumb? Not to worry.⠀
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Visit southernlivingplantcollection for great tips, inspiration, and even purchase your plants on-line!⠀
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📸  southernlivingmag ⠀
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#homedecor #curbappeal #frontdoor #garden #southernliving #slhomes #bloom #welocome #updateyourlook #realtor #realestate #porchlife #lowcountryliving #charleston #charlestonsc #southcarolina #discoversc #sclowcountry #explorecharleston #summervillesc #lovewhereyoulive #jimbrantleyrealtor
“Beaufort River Sunset”
Digital Drawing in Adobe Illustrator
20 x 20”
2021#PopArtists #PopArtLover #PopArts #AcrylicPainter #PopArtGallery #PaintingOnCanvas #PopArtGallery #PaintingADay #PaintersOfIG #PainterArtist #AcrylicPaintingArt #PaintersLife #FineArtGallery #FineArtZone #FineArtwork #FineArtLandscape #FineArtCollector #FineArtPaintings #LandscapePaintings #LandscapePaintingNow #LandscapeArtist #LandscapeArtwork #FineArtLandscape #beaufortsc #sclowcountry #lowcountryliving #beaufortriver #beaufortsouthcarolina
Excited to announce that I have joined the best team in the land business, Whitetail Properties Real Estate! Whitetail Properties is a national real estate company that specializes in hunting, timber, and farm land. As a Land Specialist, I will be here to provide professional real estate representation to both buyer and sellers in South Carolina.If you have looking to buy or sell a piece of property or just want to learn more about the company, give me a call, I'd love to hear from you!#whitetailproperties
#sclowcountry
#land
Help! I need a title for this one. Post your title in the comments below.
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#drone #dronephotography #dji #djimavic3 #shrimp #sclowcountry
Sweet's Elderberry has arrived at indigo.mercantile in #GeorgetownSC!  Allergy-busting Sweet's Syrup (with raw Carolina honey), award-winning Shrub, unsweetened Extract and travel-friendly Tincture have joined the lineup at this GORGEOUS gourmet grocery.It features items from local farms including fresh eggs, grass-fed beef and just-picked strawberries, an extensive bottle shop with tastings, everyday items for kitchens, and fresh sandwiches for a quick lunch.  Be sure to check out their twin business just across the street, Indigo Bakery indigobakerytreats - YUM!#georgetown #sclowcountry #lowcountrylife #lowcountryliving #shoplocalsc #littlecharleston #gourmetgrocery #farmfreshsc #scgrown #beachtown
Our kind of #MondayMotivation 😍 #DiscoverSC 📸📍Bluffton Oyster Company: daniymathews

The South Carolina Lowcountry Guidebook is filled with many things to see and do in the beautiful Lowcountry of South Carolina. Please fill out the information and we will send you a FREE GUIDE BOOK.


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